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Our Resource Library includes resources developed and produced by NIWRC, as well as various resources from other outside sources. We encourage you to explore and utilize these resources, using the 'Resource Topic' and 'Search' toolbar below. With regard to NIWRC produced resources, our NIWRC staff and consultants develop and produce culturally appropriate resources to support Tribes, Tribal programs and advocates working on issues of violence against Native women. These resources include webinars, special collections, booklets, fact sheets, research papers, videos, toolkits, reports, training curriculum and materials, among many other supporting documents. NIWRC produced resources may be repurposed or reproduced as long as NIWRC is cited as the source. You can also view resources on NIWRC's Advocate! mobile app or view our dedicated video channel.

Quick Search: Advocacy | Children | Domestic Violence | FVPSA | Health and Wellness | MMIW | Sexual Assault | Sex Trafficking | Shelter | VAWA

To request technical assistance on a specific resource, please connect with NIWRC staff through our Contact Us page.

The work to end violence against Native women and recreate peaceful, harmonious communities is based on reclaiming our traditional values, belief systems and life ways. As shown in the Nonviolence Equality Wheel, the key values of this life way are: compassion, respect, generosity, mutual sharing, humility, contributing/industriousness, courage, love and being spiritually centered. At the center of this tool is equality. Equality is recognizing that everyone has the right to follow their path. Equality means power-sharing, not holding power over. Equality is at the center of all healthy relationships.More Info >>
Our whole world has changed, our whole way of life has been put on hold. These are truly trying and difficult times for so many people. Tribal domestic violence advocates are struggling to find their footing and respond as best they can under the circumstances, given the lack of resources, tribal infrastructures and an increase in domestic violence. Indigenous people and Tribal Nations experience multiple levels of trauma, including Historical Trauma. All this contributes to our response to the current pandemic. This important webinar will look at how historical trauma influences our responses to COVID-19. It will discuss the impact...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
This timely and important webinar will define and look at burn out versus moral injury. The term “burnout” is a relatively new term, first coined in 1974 by Herbert Freudenberger, in his book, Burnout: The High Cost of High Achievement. He originally defined burnout as, “the extinction of motivation or incentive, especially where one's devotion to a cause or relationship fails to produce the desired results.” The term burn out, quite often does not accurately describe what’s going on with regard to domestic violence advocates. Burn out suggests a failure of resourcefulness and resilience. This webinar will help us understand...More Info >>
The Native Women’s Society of the Great Plains developed a culturally specific curriculum for advocates to use in shelter when working with children. This webinar will introduce the curriculum which uses culturally relevant skills and knowledge with a focus on safety, self-esteem and family empowerment. The skills introduced come from a place of values that not only help the child develop a safety plan but include the parent in the development and implementation of the plan. The activities identified are meant to be an easy tool for shelter staff to use and are cost effective. The idea is to help...More Info >>
INTRODUCTION This Special Collection is a new video resource initiative of the NIWRC, a project inspired by the national TED Talks: Ideas Worth Spreading. WAS Talks was launched and recorded during the June 2018 Women Are Sacred Conference. The special collection is developed to highlight the issues, resources and other suggestions by tribal survivors, advocates, researchers, legal community, social workers, law enforcement, community/family members, child welfare workers, philosophers, community leaders, politicians and tribal leaders. The Special Collection organizes fifteen women in attendance at the 2018 Women Are Sacred conference, who shared their stories, spoke their truth and healing. Our tribal...More Info >>
*/ /*--> */ This webinar focuses on love, healing and self-care. Dr. Duran will introduce the pillars of compassion and how through loving and taking care of ourselves we become better advocates, better human beings and more grounded and rooted in our work of ending the violence. Presenter: Dr. Bonnie Duran, Director, Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, University of WashingtonMore Info >>
Understanding the mind body spirit connection, using its power and accessing its’ benefits is the basis of holistic healing. The concept of mind body spirit has been rooted in the culture and traditions of Indigenous peoples for thousands of years and is central to our belief and healing systems. Our healing systems and cultural practices took advantage of the power of belief or mind over body. Mind body spirit health and healing starts with you. When you make the choice for healing mind body and spirit, you reclaim your power and become an active participant in your healing process. Please...More Info >>
Does your program or tribe need some help creating materials promoting non-violence against Native women and children? Review our current 19 x13in Posters and 11 x 3.5in Bumper Stickers that your organization can customize to fit your needs. All materials listed here are provided under this Creative Commons 4.0 Public Licence . We would love to know how these materials are being used, so please send us a link to your final products . You will need: Adobe Illustrator CS6 + Locate your own printing company (suggestions provided below). Pay for your own printing of materials. Customize Capabilities: Download this...More Info >>
Published on Oct 20, 2016 This video describes the findings of a National Institute of Justice (NIJ) supported study on the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. Specifically, the study provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners over the lifetime of American Indian and Alaska Native women and men as well as victimization estimates over of the past year (based on 2010 data). It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations and briefly examines the impact of violence. The results should be used...More Info >>
In Native cultures, Native peoples had non-violent life ways based on an understanding of the natural world, viewing health through the traditional concepts of balance and sense of well-being. This webinar will discuss how restoring traditional family values can support positive social change and healthy community characteristics where Native families can exist in a web of relationships, each equal in importance and value. Presented by Theda New Breast, MPH, Native Wellness Institute */ /*--> */More Info >>