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Our Resource Library includes resources developed and produced by NIWRC, as well as various resources from other outside sources. We encourage you to explore and utilize these resources, using the 'Resource Topic' and 'Search' toolbar below. With regard to NIWRC produced resources, our NIWRC staff and consultants develop and produce culturally appropriate resources to support Tribes, Tribal programs and advocates working on issues of violence against Native women. These resources include webinars, special collections, booklets, fact sheets, research papers, videos, toolkits, reports, training curriculum and materials, among many other supporting documents. NIWRC produced resources may be repurposed or reproduced as long as NIWRC is cited as the source. You can also view resources on NIWRC's Advocate! mobile app or view our dedicated video channel.

Quick Search: Advocacy | Children | Domestic Violence | FVPSA | Health and Wellness | MMIW | Sexual Assault | Sex Trafficking | Shelter | VAWA

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Advocacy for survivors of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) requires an understanding of the dynamics and tactics of IPV. This understanding is also necessary for advocacy for social change to end domestic violence. This webinar will provide an overview of the root causes of domestic violence in Indigenous communities. It will also explain the dynamics and tactics of IPV from a survivor’s perspective. Highlighted in this webinar is the importance of traditional, cultural practices in strengthening and building our capacity to provide effective, respectful advocacy with our relatives surviving IPV and other forms of domestic violence. It is our goal to...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
This celebratory webinar is dedicated to Tillie Black Bear, Wa Wokiye Win (Woman Who Helps Everyone), for her contributions as a founding grandmother, Unci , of the movement to end violence against women in the United States and across Tribal Nations. Unci Tillie gave hope and healing to generations of survivors, advocates, and Native Americans by her dedication to organizing the Violence Against Women Movement. Unci Tillie organized at the Tribal, state, and national levels to change laws and policies at the root of these injustices and disparities. She inspired thousands from all walks of life to end domestic violence...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
This Advocacy Information Packet is a collection of articles, booklets and handouts covering a range of topics about advocacy with emphasis on work with survivors of intimate partner violence. These materials offer information that is critical to clarifying and strengthening the role of advocates and their work to end violence against women and other survivors. The goal is to create a basic understanding about the role of advocates, the nature of advocacy and some key issues integral to effective advocacy. These materials can be helpful for new advocate orientation, in-services, cross-trainings and public education events.More Info >>, IntroductionMore Info >>, ResourcesMore Info >>
Tools for Transformation: Becoming Accessible, Culturally Responsive, and Trauma-Informed Organizations Implementation Support Guides for Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Programs GUIDE 1 THE SOCIAL, EMOTIONAL, AND RELATIONAL CLIMATE AND ORGANIZATIONAL TRAUMA Published by the National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health. The ACRTI Implementation Support Guides are intentionally focused toward program leaders and contain resources and strategies to support organizational change. This first guide focuses on organizational trauma and the social, emotional, and relational aspects of our organizations. It offers leaders information, opportunities for reflection, and strategies to support transformation.More Info >>
Tribal Sovereignty and Native Women's Sovereignty brochure. Download or purchase printed copies here .More Info >>
We know that American Indian/Alaska Native women experience some of the highest rates for domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, sex trafficking, homicide at the hands of an intimate partner, and missing & murdered. Women with disabilities are of double risk for violence and abuse. This webinar will offer data on American Indian/Alaska Native disabilities in equal access, fair accommodations, and an opportunity to make powerful contributions to provide accessible, safe, and effective services to individuals with disabilities and Deaf individuals who are victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. Presenter: Cleveland J. Doxater (CJ) is from the...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention Fact Sheet on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native people. CDC uses datasets from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS), the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS), and the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS), to inform MMIP efforts. For more information on CDC’s tribal work, visit: www.cdc.gov/tribal.htmlFor National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's visit: www.cdc.gov/injury/fundedprograms/tribal.htmlMore Info >>
This sample proclamation aims to assist Tribal leaders and advocates in their efforts to proclaim October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month across Tribal Nations, Alaska Native villages, and Indian and Native Hawaiian communities. We encourage you to download and customize this template as needed.More Info >>
This sample proclamation aims to assist Tribal leaders and advocates in their efforts to proclaim April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month across Tribal Nations, Alaska Native villages, and Indian and Native Hawaiian communities. We encourage you to download and customize this template as needed.More Info >>
VAWA 2005 requires the DOJ, HHS, and DOI to engage in formal consultation with Indian tribes on an annual basis to address concerns that impact the safety of Indian women at the broadest level. Participation in this nation-to-nation consultation is critically important for tribal leaders to dialogue with government officials about solutions and strategies to address issues related to violence against Native women. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)/Battering is the purposeful use of a system of multiple, continuous tactics to maintain power and control over another. As described in the Intimate Partner Violence Triangle, this intentional violence results from and is supported by unnatural, misogynistic, sexist societal and cultural belief systems. This tool describes the types of physical and psychological abuse that may be used to maintain power and control over a current or former intimate partner or spouse.More Info >>
The work to end violence against Native women and recreate peaceful, harmonious communities is based on reclaiming our traditional values, belief systems and life ways. As shown in the Nonviolence Equality Wheel, the key values of this life way are: compassion, respect, generosity, mutual sharing, humility, contributing/industriousness, courage, love and being spiritually centered. At the center of this tool is equality. Equality is recognizing that everyone has the right to follow their path. Equality means power-sharing, not holding power over. Equality is at the center of all healthy relationships.More Info >>
There is a clear and established link between animal cruelty and human violence. This webinar will focus on implications for pets in the context of domestic violence. This is important since studies have shown that 48% of domestic violence victims delay leaving or remain in abusive situations because of their pets. Yet fewer than 10% of domestic violence shelters house pets and almost half of all victim/survivors do not want to be separated from their pets. During this webinar we will discuss advocacy, safety planning, resources, model policies for co-sheltering and review legal protections for animals. Facilitator: Gwendolyn Packard, Training...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
Download Report By Sovereign Bodies Institute: "To’ Kee Skuy’ Soo Ney-Wo-Chek’ addresses the severe impact of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and two spirit people (MMIWG2) and trafficking of Native people in Northern California, defined as from the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento up to the Oregon border. We set out to collect data, set up protocols, and use the data to create a justice system which speaks to the needs of the community in a healing way, all the while addressing the need for swift justice in areas where women and girls are vulnerable. Specifically, To’ Kee...More Info >>
The hardships imposed by COVID-19 are numerous, impacting advocates as individuals and their ability to provide advocacy, resources and shelter to domestic violence survivors. Stay-At-Home orders, social distancing and the other necessary steps intended to offer protection from COVID-19, often escalate the danger to victims of domestic violence and create barriers to safety. This webinar explores strategies advocates have created to navigate the challenges of the pandemic, including issues of self-care, shortages of personal protective equipment, outreach, crisis response, shelter and law enforcement and justice systems responses. With no end date in sight for the pandemic, long-term strategies are key...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
Statistics, and information on domestic violence, and human trafficking in Native Hawaiian communities by the Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based ViolenceMore Info >>
Privacy, confidentiality and privileged communications are the keystones to safety for survivors of battering or domestic violence. Protecting privacy and confidentiality of victims of domestic violence is directly related to a survivor’s ability to trust, ask for advocacy, support and help. The law provides certain protections to conversations referred to as “privileged communications” between two individuals. All of these protections are important to understand as well as any legal limitations that local laws may impose. This booklet will provide basic guidance for advocates and shelter programs to understand and implement or integrate these practices for the protection of those who...More Info >>
Our whole world has changed, our whole way of life has been put on hold. These are truly trying and difficult times for so many people. Tribal domestic violence advocates are struggling to find their footing and respond as best they can under the circumstances, given the lack of resources, tribal infrastructures and an increase in domestic violence. Indigenous people and Tribal Nations experience multiple levels of trauma, including Historical Trauma. All this contributes to our response to the current pandemic. This important webinar will look at how historical trauma influences our responses to COVID-19. It will discuss the impact...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. The report from the 2016 consultation is available here. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability...More Info >>
During the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. In 2005, the movement for safety of Native women resulted in the inclusion of the “Safety for Indian Women” title within the Violence Against Women Act. A study released by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average. Over the last decade awareness of this national issue has increased but...More Info >>

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