You are here

NIWRC’s Resource Library includes resources developed and produced by NIWRC, as well as various resources from other outside sources. We encourage you to explore and utilize these resources, using the “Resource Topic” and “Search” tool bar below.

With regard to NIWRC produced resources, our NIWRC staff and consultants develop and produce culturally appropriate resources for tribes and advocates working on issues of violence against Native women such as domestic violence, teen dating violence, sexual assault, trafficking, missing and murdered Indigenous women, and more. These resources include webinars, special collections, booklets, fact sheets, research papers, videos, toolkits, reports, training curriculum and materials, among many other supporting documents.

NIWRC produced resources may be repurposed or reproduced as long as NIWRC is cited as the source. For additional technical assistance, we encourage you to connect with NIWRC staff through our online contact form. You can also view resources on NIWRC's Advocate! mobile app or view our dedicated video channel.

This webinar provides a rare opportunity to reflect upon the meaning of the sacredness of women. Especially, in the face of the impact of colonization and modern day levels of violence against native women, how do we, as indigenous women, experience, understand, nurture and protect our sacredness? What are some of our traditional practices and teachings that can help us embrace indigenous women’s spirituality to decolonize, help each other heal and revitalize our sacredness? Presenters: Cheryl Neskahi Coan, Amanda Takes War Bonnett, Rose “Loke” Pettigrew, Lenora “Lynne” Hootch */More Info >>
This timely and important webinar will define and look at burn out versus moral injury. The term “burnout” is a relatively new term, first coined in 1974 by Herbert Freudenberger, in his book, Burnout: The High Cost of High Achievement. He originally defined burnout as, “the extinction of motivation or incentive, especially where one's devotion to a cause or relationship fails to produce the desired results.” The term burn out, quite often does not accurately describe what’s going on with regard to domestic violence advocates. Burn out suggests a failure of resourcefulness and resilience. This webinar will help us understand...More Info >>
*/ This celebratory webinar will highlight the milestones leading up to and since the passage of the Violence Against Women Act in 1994 for Tribal Nations and Alaska Native Villages. Hear the voices of key players in the implementation of this vital legislation. Experience the ground swell, feel the hope, realize the fruits of our labor and share the dream, safe and loving communities and “No More Violence Against Our Women.” This webinar is dedicated to Tillie Black Bear, founding mother of the movement to end violence against women everywhere. Tillie Black Bear (Sicangu Lakota), Wa Wokiye Win (Woman Who...More Info >>
*/ The Native Women’s Society of the Great Plains developed a culturally specific curriculum for advocates to use in shelter when working with children. This webinar will introduce the curriculum which uses culturally relevant skills and knowledge with a focus on safety, self-esteem and family empowerment. The skills introduced come from a place of values that not only help the child develop a safety plan but include the parent in the development and implementation of the plan. The activities identified are meant to be an easy tool for shelter staff to use and are cost effective. The idea is to...More Info >>
*/ This webinar is designed for tribal communities and provides culturally based responses to the needs of Native lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender and/or two-spirit (LGBT/2S) survivors. Violent victimization among Native LGBT/2S individuals is a critical issue that service providers must be made aware and how to assist with victims from this specific population. The presentation will also provide understandings of gender/sexual identities and resources and recommendations to better provide victim services to the Native LGBT/2S community. Presenter: Elton NaswoodMore Info >>
*/ This presentation will address the need for advocacy and the necessity of providing victims of crime in tribal communities with the rights they are owed pursuant to federal and tribal law. The speaker will cover the federal Crime Victims’ Rights Act and relevant tribal codes. The session will also include specific examples of where tribal traditions have been included in the court process, for example at sentencing. Finally, the training will cover special protections provided to child victims and witnesses. The goal of this webinar is to provide examples of laws, programs and initiatives for victims of crime in...More Info >>
*/ Description: VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability and enhance the safety for Native women...More Info >>
*/ This timely and important webinar presentation, in cooperation with the Family Violence Prevention and Services program office (FVPSA), is on disaster planning and preparedness. It focuses on how we, as tribal domestic violence programs and shelters can prepare and insure our ability to conduct business after a disaster strikes. Natural disasters are becoming more and more commonplace. Disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, tsunamis and record snow storms and freezing temperatures have a powerful impact on the work we do in our communities. In addition, there is data that shows an increase of domestic violence during and...More Info >>
*/ This webinar with provide an Indigenous grassroots overview of participatory research methods that we can use to tell our story about the important work we are doing in our communities. The webinar will be an introductory tour that will touch upon: (a) reasons to consider doing research, (b) the types of questions that can (and cannot) be addressed by quantitative and qualitative research, (c) when research should (and should not) be undertaken, and (d) working with outside researchers. It will also pose ethical considerations and introduce the IRB process. An example of a small-scale, participatory research project with a...More Info >>
*/ Honoring Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women to Guide our Advocacy for Change During the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. In 2005, the movement for safety of Native women resulted in the “Safety for Indian Women” being included under the Violence Against Women Act. A study released by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average. Over...More Info >>
*/ Title: Fostering Resilience in Children Traumatized by Domestic Violence in Collaboration with their Non-offending Parent Description: FVPSA event in collaboration with NIWRC There are often lifelong and devastating consequences for children who have been traumatized by witnessing domestic violence against a parent or caregiver. Trauma can lead to challenging and misunderstood behaviors and emotions in children. These behaviors often result in damaging labeling and inappropriate or negative responses [from others?]. This webinar considers ways to recognize how trauma impacts children and offers ways to support healing and resiliency to them in collaboration with their parent. Inter-generational trauma and culturally-based...More Info >>
*/ This webinar focuses on love, healing and self-care. Dr. Duran will introduce the pillars of compassion and how through loving and taking care of ourselves we become better advocates, better human beings and more grounded and rooted in our work of ending the violence. Presenter: Dr. Bonnie Duran, Director, Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, University of WashingtonMore Info >>
This webinar will address the importance of confidentiality between victim advocates and survivors, and the policy and social science rationales for victim advocates establishing and maintaining protocols around these communications. Victim advocates will learn about confidentiality, privileged communications, written informed consent protocols, the laws addressing these communications, and how to respond to tribal court-related requests for confidential or privileged communications. Victim advocates will learn about necessary procedures, forms, and other tools and resources that will help them protect survivor autonomy, while working effectively with tribal court systems and related personnel. Presented by: Rob (Roberta) Valente Domestic Violence Policy & Advocacy...More Info >>
Building Girls’ Protective Assets in Indian Country: Intentional Girl-Centered Program Design The protective asset building approach emerged internationally in the late 1990s as a way to increase teenage girls’ resilience and overall capabilities. It grew in response to research showing that girls’ access to resources and support in their community shrinks at puberty due to heightened fears of sexual violence. At this life-stage girls are not well-served by programs that cater to either children or adult women. Protective assets are strengths and skills held by girls which can help them stay safer, weather a crisis, and better plan for the...More Info >>
VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. We hope that our Tribal Coalitions will join this webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues so that together we can address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women. Tribal Coalitions are in a unique position to prepare tribal leaders regarding national and local recommendations...More Info >>
VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability and enhance the safety for Native women. Tribal Title,...More Info >>
FVPSA Standing Tribal Funding Opportunity Announcement HHS-2018-ACF-ACYF-FVPS-1349 */More Info >>
This timely and important webinar will provide an overview of what is known about the opioid epidemic and will focus on the specific concerns of Indian communities and tribal domestic violence programs and shelters. It will lay the foundation for the exploding opioid epidemic and will examine the intersections between trauma, domestic violence and the opioid epidemic and explore innovative approaches to addressing these complex issues. */More Info >>
This webinar will provide updates on recent VAWA reauthorization efforts and the importance of continued advocacy for a permanent VOCA fix for a dedicated tribal funding stream under the Crime Victims Fund (CVF). While a historic victory was achieved by the provision of tribal funding under the CVF in the FY 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill, the Department of Justice is pressed to award $133 million to Indian tribes before September 30, 2018. Discussion will also focus on concerns and challenges the timing of this award presents for tribes. Tribal grassroots organizing efforts have been and will continue to play a...More Info >>
In 2013, the Violence Against Women Act was reauthorized. This reauthorization included new amendments that directly impacted tribal communities and victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, dating violence and stalking. This webinar will give an overview of Title IX of the Violence Against Women Act. Facilitators, Jacqueline Agtuca and Caroline LaPorte will go through Title IX section by section to provide tribal coalitions with a foundational review of VAWA Title IX, including important consultation mandates and processes for change. */More Info >>

Pages