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Our Resource Library includes resources developed and produced by NIWRC, as well as various resources from other outside sources. We encourage you to explore and utilize these resources, using the 'Resource Topic' and 'Search' toolbar below. With regard to NIWRC produced resources, our NIWRC staff and consultants develop and produce culturally appropriate resources to support Tribes, Tribal programs and advocates working on issues of violence against Native women. These resources include webinars, special collections, booklets, fact sheets, research papers, videos, toolkits, reports, training curriculum and materials, among many other supporting documents. NIWRC produced resources may be repurposed or reproduced as long as NIWRC is cited as the source. You can also view resources on NIWRC's Advocate! mobile app or view our dedicated video channel.

Quick Search: Advocacy | Children | Domestic Violence | FVPSA | Health and Wellness | MMIW | Sexual Assault | Sex Trafficking | Shelter | VAWA

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//--> //--> INTRODUCTION This Special Collection is developed to support cultural competency/humility initiatives, and educational or research projects requiring Native specific information and resources. The Special Collection provides background reading, research, organizational information, ally-building and cultural competency resources focused on Indian Country and domestic and sexual violence. This Collection includes recommended readings on: Domestic & Sexual Violence Against Native Women & Children, Action Guidance, Indigenous/Native/Tribal Domestic & Sexual Violence Resource Centers, and Indigenous/Tribal Organizations and Ally-Building-Cultural Competency/Humility-Anti-oppression Trainers/Consultants resources . The section titled Sovereignty, Federal Law & Jurisdictional Issues is unique and integral to work within Indian Country. Unlike other...More Info >>
This celebratory webinar will highlight the milestones leading up to and since the passage of the Violence Against Women Act in 1994 for Tribal Nations and Alaska Native Villages. Hear the voices of key players in the implementation of this vital legislation. Experience the ground swell, feel the hope, realize the fruits of our labor and share the dream, safe and loving communities and “No More Violence Against Our Women.” This webinar is dedicated to Tillie Black Bear, founding mother of the movement to end violence against women everywhere. Tillie Black Bear (Sicangu Lakota), Wa Wokiye Win (Woman Who Helps...More Info >>
The Native Women’s Society of the Great Plains developed a culturally specific curriculum for advocates to use in shelter when working with children. This webinar will introduce the curriculum which uses culturally relevant skills and knowledge with a focus on safety, self-esteem and family empowerment. The skills introduced come from a place of values that not only help the child develop a safety plan but include the parent in the development and implementation of the plan. The activities identified are meant to be an easy tool for shelter staff to use and are cost effective. The idea is to help...More Info >>
This booklet, "Strong Families Respect Each Other: What Native Youth Need to Know About the Connection Between Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence" (12 pages) was produced by NIWRC in partnership with the Native Youth Sexual Health Network . This booklet contains definitions on domestic violence and sexual assault, examples of sexual assault, myths and truths about sexual assault, what to do if you have been sexually assaulted, what to do if you know or think a friend or family member has experienced sexual assault, our power as life-givers and cool apps that can help prevent violence. Order printed copies.More Info >>
This booklet, " Strong Families Respect Each Other: What Native Youth Need to Know About Domestic Violence" (14 pages) was produced by NIWRC in partnership with the Native Youth Sexual Health Network . This booklet contains definitions on domestic violence, examples of controlling violence, what to do if you're experiencing domestic violence in any form, for family and friends of people experiencing domestic violence and how Native youth can lead the change to break the silence around domestic violence in their communities. Order printed copies.More Info >>
This webinar is designed for tribal communities and provides culturally based responses to the needs of Native lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender and/or two-spirit (LGBT/2S) survivors. Violent victimization among Native LGBT/2S individuals is a critical issue that service providers must be made aware and how to assist with victims from this specific population. The presentation will also provide understandings of gender/sexual identities and resources and recommendations to better provide victim services to the Native LGBT/2S community. Presenter: Elton NaswoodMore Info >>
*/ /*--> */ This presentation will address the need for advocacy and the necessity of providing victims of crime in tribal communities with the rights they are owed pursuant to federal and tribal law. The speaker will cover the federal Crime Victims’ Rights Act and relevant tribal codes. The session will also include specific examples of where tribal traditions have been included in the court process, for example at sentencing. Finally, the training will cover special protections provided to child victims and witnesses. The goal of this webinar is to provide examples of laws, programs and initiatives for victims of...More Info >>
INTRODUCTION This Special Collection is a new video resource initiative of the NIWRC, a project inspired by the national TED Talks: Ideas Worth Spreading. WAS Talks was launched and recorded during the June 2018 Women Are Sacred Conference. The special collection is developed to highlight the issues, resources and other suggestions by tribal survivors, advocates, researchers, legal community, social workers, law enforcement, community/family members, child welfare workers, philosophers, community leaders, politicians and tribal leaders. The Special Collection organizes fifteen women in attendance at the 2018 Women Are Sacred conference, who shared their stories, spoke their truth and healing. Our tribal...More Info >>
This webinar will address the importance of confidentiality between victim advocates and survivors, and the policy and social science rationales for victim advocates establishing and maintaining protocols around these communications. Victim advocates will learn about confidentiality, privileged communications, written informed consent protocols, the laws addressing these communications, and how to respond to tribal court-related requests for confidential or privileged communications. Victim advocates will learn about necessary procedures, forms, and other tools and resources that will help them protect survivor autonomy, while working effectively with tribal court systems and related personnel. Presented by: Rob (Roberta) Valente Domestic Violence Policy & Advocacy...More Info >>
The 2019 Women Are Sacred calendar includes awareness months and days reflecting the safety for Native women movement along with beautiful color photographs, artwork and images. Awareness months and days include introductions, definitions and resources on Human Trafficking Awareness Month, National stalking Awareness Month, Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Child Abuse Prevention Month, National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, Domestic Violence Awareness Month and International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Print Instructions: Send PDF to local or online printer for quality print...More Info >>
Coping with the disappearance of a loved one or community member is very difficult. The fact that American Indian and Alaska Native women experience higher rates of domestic violence and sexual assault than any other population of women in the United States has broad ramifications. One consequence of this reality is that domestic and sexual violence occurs on a spectrum of abusive behavior and can include abduction and murder. If a woman you know is missing, taking immediate action is very important. The quicker you respond, the faster she may be located and provided the help needed.More Info >>
This brochure gives women a guide for enhancing their personal safety and that of family members, while outlining tactics of power and control over women. The Safety Guide is also useful in community education efforts. The Safety Guide is also available for purchase.More Info >>
Indigenous advocates have played a critical role in speaking out against violence and injustice. They have brought national attention to the diversity and unique needs in tribal communities. They have readily and thoughtfully informed national policy based on their own experience and the experiences of survivors, families and communities. They have taught us and continue to teach us to be good relatives and better human beings. They have continuously contributed to this ever-expanding movement to address the multitude and complexity of issues facing tribal nations, Indian communities and Alaska Native villages. Join us in listening to the voices of Indigenous...More Info >>
*This collection was developed and authored by the Indian Law Resource Center ( www.indianlaw.org ) February 10, 2016. International Advocacy to Help End Violence Against Native Women TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION I. United Nations (UN) A. Key Documents 1. World Conference on Indigenous Peoples Outcome Document (2014) 2. UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) 3. Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (1993) 4. Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) 5. UN Charter (1945) 6. List of resolutions and reports by the General Assembly and the Secretary General on violence against women II. UN General...More Info >>
2016 Excellence in Journalism Conference (EIJ16) Session Information: Covering Domestic Violence Against Native Women. Native women suffer from violence at a rate two and a half times greater than that of any other population in the United States. One in three Native women will be raped in her lifetime; four in five will be victims of a violent assault. Join the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) and a panel of Native journalists covering domestic violence for a discussion on the legal and ethical ramifications for journalists covering this topic. Includes: shared practices, common challenges and perspectives on why it’s...More Info >>
While advocacy on the domestic level is vital, violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women also has implications in the international arena. Violence against women is a pervasive human rights violation and the situation indigenous women face is particularly dire. International experts have found that indigenous women often suffer disproportionate and multiple forms of violence and higher rates of murder than other women. Advocacy at the international level can complement and strengthen advocacy efforts on the domestic level. This session will offer updates and examples of recent international advocacy work by the Alaska Native Women’s Resource Center, Indian Law...More Info >>
Native women have been leaders among their peoples since time immemorial, maintaining community wellness and teaching cultural values and life-ways for thousands of years. Today’s Native women are no exception—when we work to create positive strides in the health, wellbeing, and sovereignty of our Nations, we walk in the footsteps of our grandmothers who came before us. This year, we choose to celebrate Native American Heritage Month by honoring some of these grandmothers and sharing their stories on our Facebook page . From Queen Lili’uokalani to Lozen, these women are leaders in a wide variety of fields—education, literature, arts, language...More Info >>
This resource offers a basic outline for the development of shelters and advocacy programs serving Native women who are battered or raped and their children. It provides an overall picture of elements and steps necessary in establishing a shelter. This booklet also inspires critical thinking and dialogue about the assumptions we bring to our work to stop violence against Native women. 54 pgs. Purchase printed handbook.More Info >>

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