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Domestic Violence

Webinar: Reflections on the Movement: Lessons from Tillie Black Bear in Celebration of Her Birthday

This webinar brings together long-time, nationally renowned advocates Karen Artichoker, Rita Smith, and Barbara Hart to talk about the early years of the movement to end violence against women, and the culturally centered teachings of Tillie Black Bear that continue to influence indigenous advocates to this day. The work of all three of these women began before the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (1984), so their voices bring a grassroots activist perspective that is often missing but integral to advocacy and social change.

Resource: Committed to Safety for ALL Survivors: Guidance for Domestic Violence Programs on Supporting Survivors Who Use Substances

The goal of this guide is to assist programs and advocates in supporting survivors who use substances by providing practical strategies embedded within an accessible, culturally responsive, and trauma-informed (ACRTI) approach. The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health (NCDVTMH)’s understanding of the depth of this need is informed directly by survivors, advocates, program directors, and coalitions as well as by the research it has conducted over the past 15 years.

Workbook: Missing Indigenous Sisters Tools Initiative (MISTI)

"This workbook is geared towards families of missing Native relatives. Family searches are the most invested in finding a lost loved one. They are also a powerful expression of sovereignty. Sometimes, police and other agencies need to be held accountable for inaction or apathy. With families empowered with information, the search for the missing relative cannot be derailed by apathy or inaction, in fact quite the opposite, as visibility and accountability won’t permit it. This workbook was not created in partnership with any funder or funding source.

Resource: Advocacy Information Packet

This Advocacy Information Packet is a collection of articles, booklets and handouts covering a range of topics about advocacy with emphasis on work with survivors of intimate partner violence. These materials offer information that is critical to clarifying and strengthening the role of advocates and their work to end violence against women and other survivors. The goal is to create a basic understanding about the role of advocates, the nature of advocacy and some key issues integral to effective advocacy. These materials can be helpful for new advocate orientation, in-services, cross-trainings and public education events.

Introduction

Resources

Resource Guide: Tools for Transformation Guide - Becoming Accessible, Culturally Responsive, and Trauma-Informed Organizations

Tools for Transformation: Becoming Accessible,
Culturally Responsive, and Trauma-Informed Organizations
Implementation Support Guides for Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Programs

GUIDE 1
THE SOCIAL, EMOTIONAL, AND RELATIONAL
CLIMATE AND ORGANIZATIONAL TRAUMA

Webinar: Domestic Violence and Disabilities

We know that American Indian/Alaska Native women experience some of the highest rates for domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, sex trafficking, homicide at the hands of an intimate partner, and missing & murdered.  Women with disabilities are of double risk for violence and abuse.  This webinar will offer data on American Indian/Alaska Native disabilities in equal access, fair accommodations, and an opportunity to make powerful contributions to provide accessible, safe, and effective services to individuals with disabilities and Deaf individuals who are victims of sexual assault

Resource Tool: Intimate Partner Violence Triangle

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)/Battering is the purposeful use of a system of multiple, continuous tactics to maintain power and control over another. As described in the Intimate Partner Violence Triangle, this intentional violence results from and is supported by unnatural, misogynistic, sexist societal and cultural belief systems. This tool describes the types of physical and psychological abuse that may be used to maintain power and control over a current or former intimate partner or spouse.

Resource Tool: Nonviolence Equality Wheel

The work to end violence against Native women and recreate peaceful, harmonious communities is based on reclaiming our traditional values, belief systems and life ways. As shown in the Nonviolence Equality Wheel, the key values of this life way are: compassion, respect, generosity, mutual sharing, humility, contributing/industriousness, courage, love and being spiritually centered. At the center of this tool is equality. Equality is recognizing that everyone has the right to follow their path. Equality means power-sharing, not holding power over.

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