You are here

Our Resource Library includes resources developed and produced by NIWRC, as well as various resources from other outside sources. We encourage you to explore and utilize these resources, using the 'Resource Topic' and 'Search' toolbar below. With regard to NIWRC produced resources, our NIWRC staff and consultants develop and produce culturally appropriate resources to support Tribes, Tribal programs and advocates working on issues of violence against Native women. These resources include webinars, special collections, booklets, fact sheets, research papers, videos, toolkits, reports, training curriculum and materials, among many other supporting documents. NIWRC produced resources may be repurposed or reproduced as long as NIWRC is cited as the source. You can also view resources on NIWRC's Advocate! mobile app or view our dedicated video channel.

Quick Search: Advocacy | Children | Domestic Violence | FVPSA | Health and Wellness | MMIW | Sexual Assault | Sex Trafficking | Shelter | VAWA

To request technical assistance on a specific resource, please connect with NIWRC staff through our Contact Us page.

VAWA 2005 requires the DOJ, HHS, and DOI to engage in formal consultation with Indian tribes on an annual basis to address concerns that impact the safety of Indian women at the broadest level. Participation in this nation-to-nation consultation is critically important for tribal leaders to dialogue with government officials about solutions and strategies to address issues related to violence against Native women. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
Privacy, confidentiality and privileged communications are the keystones to safety for survivors of battering or domestic violence. Protecting privacy and confidentiality of victims of domestic violence is directly related to a survivor’s ability to trust, ask for advocacy, support and help. The law provides certain protections to conversations referred to as “privileged communications” between two individuals. All of these protections are important to understand as well as any legal limitations that local laws may impose. This booklet will provide basic guidance for advocates and shelter programs to understand and implement or integrate these practices for the protection of those who...More Info >>
VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. The report from the 2016 consultation is available here. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability...More Info >>
This celebratory webinar will highlight the milestones leading up to and since the passage of the Violence Against Women Act in 1994 for Tribal Nations and Alaska Native Villages. Hear the voices of key players in the implementation of this vital legislation. Experience the ground swell, feel the hope, realize the fruits of our labor and share the dream, safe and loving communities and “No More Violence Against Our Women.” This webinar is dedicated to Tillie Black Bear, founding mother of the movement to end violence against women everywhere. Tillie Black Bear (Sicangu Lakota), Wa Wokiye Win (Woman Who Helps...More Info >>
*/ /*--> */ Description: VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability and enhance the safety for...More Info >>
The Full Faith and Credit provision under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) requires every court in the United States to recognize and enforce valid protection orders of other courts. This means that all Indian nations and states must enforce a protection order issued by another tribal court. Likewise, all Indian nations and states must enforce a protection order issued by another state court. DOWNLOAD PDF FOR MORE INFORMATION.More Info >>
VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. We hope that our Tribal Coalitions will join this webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues so that together we can address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women. Tribal Coalitions are in a unique position to prepare tribal leaders regarding national and local recommendations...More Info >>
VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability and enhance the safety for Native women. Tribal Title,...More Info >>
This webinar will provide updates on recent VAWA reauthorization efforts and the importance of continued advocacy for a permanent VOCA fix for a dedicated tribal funding stream under the Crime Victims Fund (CVF). While a historic victory was achieved by the provision of tribal funding under the CVF in the FY 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill, the Department of Justice is pressed to award $133 million to Indian tribes before September 30, 2018. Discussion will also focus on concerns and challenges the timing of this award presents for tribes. Tribal grassroots organizing efforts have been and will continue to play a...More Info >>
In 2013, the Violence Against Women Act was reauthorized. This reauthorization included new amendments that directly impacted tribal communities and victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, dating violence and stalking. This webinar will give an overview of Title IX of the Violence Against Women Act. Facilitators, Jacqueline Agtuca and Caroline LaPorte will go through Title IX section by section to provide tribal coalitions with a foundational review of VAWA Title IX, including important consultation mandates and processes for change. */ /*--> */More Info >>
Understanding the scope of sexual assaults committed against American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) within the context of intimate partner relationships and supporting timely tribal government responses can help reduce the trauma experienced by Native victim survivors of sexual assault. This webinar will focus on historical and contemporary sexual violence experienced by AI/ANs and share policy recommendations focused on the intersection of sexual assault and the related crimes of domestic violence and other related issues and limitations faced by tribal nations. The webinar aims to reduce disparities in the response to sexual assault of tribal victims by increasing awareness of...More Info >>
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Five years ago, Congress passed the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA 2013). 2 In response to the high rates of domestic violence being perpetrated against American Indian and Alaska Native women by non-Indian men, i and harrowing stories from victims whose abusers seemed out of justice’s reach, the law contained a new provision. VAWA 2013 recognized and affirmed the inherent sovereign authority of Indian tribal governments to exercise criminal jurisdiction over certain non-Indians who violate qualifying protection orders or commit domestic or dating violence against Indian victims on tribal lands. 3 This provision in VAWA...More Info >>
VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. The report from the 2016 consultation is available here. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability...More Info >>
The Violence Against Women Act, 1994-2013 - Fact Sheet The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), originally sponsored by Senators Biden and Hatch, was enacted in 1994 as a result of national grassroots organizing by battered women and advocates. These efforts included Indian women who organized to engage tribal, state, and federal systems to hold governments accountable to address the nationwide statistics, crisis, and seriousness of sexual assault, stalking and domestic violence committed against women. The Act’s passage marked the federal government’s acknowledgment of the extent and pervasiveness of violence against women and the need for more dedicated services for victims...More Info >>
The Department of Justice’s annual Tribal Consultation on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women is held pursuant to Public Law 109-162 , Title IX, Section 903 of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2005. This law requires the U.S. Attorney General to conduct an annual consultation with Indian tribal governments to address the federal administration of all tribal funds and programs established under the Violence Against Women Acts (VAWA) of 1994, 2000, and 2005. The statute further directs the Attorney General to solicit recommendations from the Indian tribes at an annual consultation concerning the following items: administering...More Info >>
Introduction On March 7, 2013, President Obama signed the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA 2013) into law. 1 For the first time since the U.S. Supreme Court stripped tribal governments of their criminal authority over non-Indians in Oliphant v. Suquamish Tribe (1978), 2 VAWA 2013 recognized and reaffirmed the inherent sovereign authority of Indian tribes to exercise criminal jurisdiction over certain non-Indians who violate protection orders or commit dating violence or domestic violence against Indian victims on tribal lands. 3 Known as Special Domestic Violence Criminal Jurisdiction (SDVCJ), this limited tribal criminal jurisdiction over non-Indians has fundamentally...More Info >>
Both the Indian Child Welfare Act and the Violence Against Women Act tribal jurisdiction provision (section 904) recognize the inherent sovereignty of Indian Nations to protect their women and children. However, both are under attack. This webinar will take a close look at the non-Indian attacks on ICWA and VAWA, how they intersect, and what lessons we can learn from defending these attacks to ensure that our own communities best utilize these important laws to protect our women and children. Presenter: Mary Kathryn joined Pipestem Law in 2015. She specializes in federal Indian law and has drafted numerous appellate briefs...More Info >>