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Our Resource Library includes resources developed and produced by NIWRC, as well as various resources from other outside sources. We encourage you to explore and utilize these resources, using the 'Resource Topic' and 'Search' toolbar below. With regard to NIWRC produced resources, our NIWRC staff and consultants develop and produce culturally appropriate resources to support Tribes, Tribal programs and advocates working on issues of violence against Native women. These resources include webinars, special collections, booklets, fact sheets, research papers, videos, toolkits, reports, training curriculum and materials, among many other supporting documents. NIWRC produced resources may be repurposed or reproduced as long as NIWRC is cited as the source. You can also view resources on NIWRC's Advocate! mobile app or view our dedicated video channel.

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The Presidential Task Force on Missing and Murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives, also known as Operation Lady Justice (OLJ), is closely coordinating with the Tribes and states which are already at work on the issues surrounding missing and murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives via established task forces or other efforts with similar goals and objectives. OLJ is facilitating the sharing of information among the federal, tribal, and state task forces and efforts. Through sharing of information on all on-going efforts, individual Tribes, states, and OLJ can learn from each other, develop common understandings, and strategize on activities and...More Info >>
Indigenous people account for less than 3% of the population in Wyoming. They live in all 23 counties, with the largest population living in Fremont County and on the Wind River Indian Reservation (WRIR). The WRIR is currently home to two tribes, the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapaho. In addition to members of these two tribes, Indigenous people enrolled in other tribes or not enrolled members of any tribe also call Wyoming home. Despite their small percentage of the population, Indigenous people experience violence, homicide, sexual assault, and are reported missing at disproportionate rates relative to any other race/ethnicity...More Info >>
This report to the Minnesota Legislature includes mandates that aim to reduce and end violence against Indigenous women, girls, and two spirit people in Minnesota. It will serve as a road map for the Commissioner of Public Safety, other state agencies, and organizations that provide legal, social, and other community services throughout Minnesota. Information presented in this report reflects the truths of survivors of violence, family members, community members, government agencies, and experts. It was compiled over more than a year of public hearings, community conversations, interviews with experts, and evidence gathering. It delivers 20 mandates for systemic and community...More Info >>
On May 3, 2019, President Trump became the first President to formally recognize Missing and Murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives Day. Following this recognition, on November 26, 2019, President Trump, joined by Native American leaders from across the country, signed Executive Order 13898 (EO), https://operationladyjustice.usdoj.gov/about , forming the Presidential Task Force on Missing and Murdered American Indians and Alaska Natives (Task Force). The Task Force, also known as Operation Lady Justice (OLJ), aims to enhance the operation of the criminal justice system and address the concerns of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities regarding missing and murdered people—...More Info >>
This report is informed by the relatives of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, along with advocates, law enforcement, legislators, organizations and community members. Our goal is to share the words and experiences of families to expose gaps in our justice system and in the resources and services for families, victims and survivors. Our hope is that this report reflects the voices and experiences of our communities and every person who has been impacted or knows someone who has been impacted by this profound crisis in our state. Although this is a national crisis, the state of New Mexico...More Info >>
This 20 x 24” informational poster provides an overview of how jurisdiction works in Indian country and the legal rights of crime victims. It includes specific information related to tribal, state, federal and shared jurisdiction, as well as charts covering criminal jurisdiction inside and outside of PL 280 states. This poster is part of our MMIW Toolkit for Understanding and Responding to Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women for Families and Communities.More Info >>
This customizable 8 x 11” missing person flyer template is an important tool for generating awareness when a Native woman is missing or suspected to be missing. Download and update this flyer template with relevant information and a recent photo of your missing loved one to clearly, effectively, and efficiently share information throughout the community. This flyer can be saved as a PDF for digital sharing with law enforcement and advocacy organizations. This flyer template is part of our MMIW Toolkit for Understanding and Responding to Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women for Families and Communities.More Info >>
This 8 x 11” tri-fold brochure is designed as a quick reference guide for when a Native woman goes missing and the immediate steps to take in the first 72 hours. The first 72 hours of a missing person investigation are the most critical, and this brochure serves as a starting point for families, communities and advocacy organizations to organize an immediate response. Important steps include: - Contact law enforcement - Gather and track additional information - Preserve important evidence - Enlist the immediate help of your family, community or domestic violence program This brochure is a part of our...More Info >>
This comprehensive 3.5 x 5.5” pocket guide is designed to be broadly used by families and advocacy organizations to respond when a Native woman goes missing. It provides: - Immediate steps to take in the first 72 hours - Background information on missing and murdered Indigenous women (MMIW) - What legal rights exist and where they come from - Who has authority to investigate the missing person’s case - Who has jurisdiction to prosecute a murder, abduction, or related MMIW crime - What other resources are available to assist the family or Native community This pocket guide is a part...More Info >>
"This workbook is geared towards families of missing Native relatives. Family searches are the most invested in finding a lost loved one. They are also a powerful expression of sovereignty. Sometimes, police and other agencies need to be held accountable for inaction or apathy. With families empowered with information, the search for the missing relative cannot be derailed by apathy or inaction, in fact quite the opposite, as visibility and accountability won’t permit it. This workbook was not created in partnership with any funder or funding source. Rather, made because there is a need by people who see how this...More Info >>
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention Fact Sheet on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native people. CDC uses datasets from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS), the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS), and the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS), to inform MMIP efforts. For more information on CDC’s tribal work, visit: www.cdc.gov/tribal.htmlFor National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's visit: www.cdc.gov/injury/fundedprograms/tribal.htmlMore Info >>
Download Report By Sovereign Bodies Institute: "To’ Kee Skuy’ Soo Ney-Wo-Chek’ addresses the severe impact of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and two spirit people (MMIWG2) and trafficking of Native people in Northern California, defined as from the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento up to the Oregon border. We set out to collect data, set up protocols, and use the data to create a justice system which speaks to the needs of the community in a healing way, all the while addressing the need for swift justice in areas where women and girls are vulnerable. Specifically, To’ Kee...More Info >>
During the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. In 2005, the movement for safety of Native women resulted in the inclusion of the “Safety for Indian Women” title within the Violence Against Women Act. A study released by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average. Over the last decade awareness of this national issue has increased but...More Info >>
INTRODUCTION This Special Collection is a new video resource initiative of the NIWRC, a project inspired by the national TED Talks: Ideas Worth Spreading. WAS Talks was launched and recorded during the June 2018 Women Are Sacred Conference. The special collection is developed to highlight the issues, resources and other suggestions by tribal survivors, advocates, researchers, legal community, social workers, law enforcement, community/family members, child welfare workers, philosophers, community leaders, politicians and tribal leaders. The Special Collection organizes fifteen women in attendance at the 2018 Women Are Sacred conference, who shared their stories, spoke their truth and healing. Our tribal...More Info >>
*/ /*--> */ Honoring Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women to Guide our Advocacy for Change During the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. In 2005, the movement for safety of Native women resulted in the “Safety for Indian Women” being included under the Violence Against Women Act. A study released by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national...More Info >>
INTRODUCTION This Special Collection is developed to highlight the issues, concerns, reccomendations and resources for addressing Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) within our communities. The Special Collection organizes information, resources, tips and curricula drawn from the wealth of information gathered from partner organizations, experts from the field, and other allies from the web. More specifically, this toolkit will house resources on cultural issues, national sources, statistics, topical issues and approaches, existing programs, and available material and resources to create awareness and promote important discussions about MMIWG. This collection will expand as resources and new information become available...More Info >>, $( function() { $( "#accordion" ).accordion({ heightStyle: "content" }); } ); $( function() { $( "#accordion" ).accordion({ collapsible: true }); } );More Info >>
The 2019 Women Are Sacred calendar includes awareness months and days reflecting the safety for Native women movement along with beautiful color photographs, artwork and images. Awareness months and days include introductions, definitions and resources on Human Trafficking Awareness Month, National stalking Awareness Month, Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Child Abuse Prevention Month, National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, Domestic Violence Awareness Month and International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Print Instructions: Send PDF to local or online printer for quality print...More Info >>
Coping with the disappearance of a loved one or community member is very difficult. The fact that American Indian and Alaska Native women experience higher rates of domestic violence and sexual assault than any other population of women in the United States has broad ramifications. One consequence of this reality is that domestic and sexual violence occurs on a spectrum of abusive behavior and can include abduction and murder. If a woman you know is missing, taking immediate action is very important. The quicker you respond, the faster she may be located and provided the help needed.More Info >>
The number of missing and unidentified persons in the United States poses one of the biggest challenges to law enforcement, medical examiners, and coroners tasked with resolving these important cases. The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) is a national information clearinghouse and resource center which offers technology, forensic services, and investigative support to help resolve cases. Funded by the National Institute of Justice and managed through a cooperative agreement with the UNT Health Science Center, NamUs offers all services at no cost to agencies or families of the missing. The online NamUs databases are accessible to all, with...More Info >>
In 2005, the movement for the safety of Native women led the struggle to include under the Violence Against Women Act a separate title for Native women called Safety for Indian Women. One of the findings of this title was that during the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than...More Info >>

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