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*/ Understanding the mind body spirit connection, using its power and accessing its’ benefits is the basis of holistic healing. The concept of mind body spirit has been rooted in the culture and traditions of Indigenous peoples for thousands of years and is central to our belief and healing systems. Our healing systems and cultural practices took advantage of the power of belief or mind over body. Mind body spirit health and healing starts with you. When you make the choice for healing mind body and spirit, you reclaim your power and become an active participant in your healing process...More Info >>
Tribal Access Project: Information Sharing and Access to Federal Databases. Tribes can more effectively serve and protect victims of domestic and sexual violence by having full access to critical data across the Criminal Justice Information Services systems and other national criminal information systems. This webinar session will provide an update on the Tribal Access Project (TAP) that the U.S. Department of Justice launched to support tribal efforts to have orders of protection enforced outside their reservations, keep guns out of the wrong hands, register sex offenders, and allow tribes to have tribal arrests and tribal convictions be associated with their...More Info >>
In the beginning, the movement to end violence against women started as a grass-roots effort of women helping women. Soon shelters were started to create a safe, temporary space for women and their children who were fleeing the violence. With the advent of shelters came the institutional process of housing women in rule-driven environments. The subject of rules in shelter is a topic that comes up again and again. This timely and important webinar asks the question, “What would happen if there were no rules? Please join tribal domestic violence shelter directors and advocates as we explore the multitude of...More Info >>
In 2005, the national movement for the safety of Native women led the struggle to include in the Violence Against Women Act a separate title for Native women called Safety for Native Women. One of the findings that justified creation of the title was that during the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates...More Info >>
Annual Consultation Prep Webinar - November 18, 2016 */More Info >>
While advocacy on the domestic level is vital, violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women also has implications in the international arena. Violence against women is a pervasive human rights violation and the situation indigenous women face is particularly dire. International experts have found that indigenous women often suffer disproportionate and multiple forms of violence and higher rates of murder than other women. Advocacy at the international level can complement and strengthen advocacy efforts on the domestic level. This session will offer updates and examples of recent international advocacy work by the Alaska Native Women’s Resource Center, Indian Law...More Info >>
In recognition of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, June 15, 2016, NIWRC is pleased to present this webinar. World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD) began ten years ago in 2006 by the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization at the United Nations to provide an opportunity for people and communities around the world “to promote a better understanding of abuse and neglect of older persons by raising awareness of the cultural, social, economic and demographic processes affecting elder abuse and neglect.” WEAAD serves as a call-to-action for individuals, tribal nations, organizations, and communities...More Info >>
The National Congress of American Indians Task Force on Violence Against Women will provide an update on efforts to remove barriers preventing American Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages from accessing the Crime Victim Fund. Unlike state and territorial governments, tribal governments do not receive an annual allocation from the Crime Victims Fund to help crime victims in their communities. American Indians and Alaska Natives experience the highest crime victimization rates in the country. Complex jurisdictional issues, along with the cultural diversity of tribes and the basic reality of geography, pose significant challenges for tribal crime victims. Tribal governments, like...More Info >>
Violence Against American Indian And Alaska Native Women And Men: 2010 Findings From The National Intimate Partner And Sexual Violence Survey ABSTRACT: NIWRC is excited to announce a webinar on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men. Few estimates are available to describe the prevalence of violence experienced by American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) women and men. In addition, these estimates are often based on local rather than national samples. The few available national estimates are often based on very small samples. These small samples do not always accurately represent the AI and AN population...More Info >>
Sexual assault is a significant issue in tribal communities. In its immediate aftermath, victims deserve access to Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) specifically trained to provide expert forensic nursing care that is victim-centered and compassionate. In 2013 the Hopi Health Care Center (HHCC) developed a SANE program following the American Indian/Alaska Native SANE-SART 2010 Initiative. Simultaneously, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health received federal funding to develop a National Tele-nursing Center (NTC). The NTC provides guidance and support for SANEs and other clinicians in remote, underserved areas. The HHCC and the NTC have been collaborating to develop a system of...More Info >>
Both the Indian Child Welfare Act and the Violence Against Women Act tribal jurisdiction provision (section 904) recognize the inherent sovereignty of Indian Nations to protect their women and children. However, both are under attack. This webinar will take a close look at the non-Indian attacks on ICWA and VAWA, how they intersect, and what lessons we can learn from defending these attacks to ensure that our own communities best utilize these important laws to protect our women and children. Presenter: Mary Kathryn joined Pipestem Law in 2015. She specializes in federal Indian law and has drafted numerous appellate briefs...More Info >>
The National Congress of American Indians Task Force on Violence Against Women will provide an update on efforts to remove barriers preventing American Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages from accessing the Crime Victim Fund. Unlike state and territorial governments, tribal governments do not receive an annual allocation from the Crime Victims Fund to help crime victims in their communities. American Indians and Alaska Natives experience the highest crime victimization rates in the country. Complex jurisdictional issues, along with the cultural diversity of tribes and the basic reality of geography, pose significant challenges for tribal crime victims. Tribal governments, like...More Info >>
The NIWRC Native Love youth project tunes into the voices of youth to hear what NativeLove means to them and how it can inform our work as advocates. NativeLove is re-launching during Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month 2016, with media campaigns, tribal school visits, community events, toolkits, building and sharing new resources, how to promote youth leadership, and information about the NativeLove youth ambassadorship. NativeLove hopes to galvanize Native youth and lend volume to their voices in recognizing healthy relationships by engaging them in a positive way with interactive opportunities for youth-to-youth-to-community relationship building. This webinar will describe the project,...More Info >>
*/ This webinar will familiarize participants with common dynamics that are associated with trafficking in tribal communities. Participants will learn what steps they might take in order to develop an effective tribal response to trafficking and will be provided with examples of how other tribes across the country have developed a response. Throughout the webinar there will be opportunity for discussion about how trafficking and prostitution uniquely impact our Native women and youth, and there will be time at the end for participants to talk about what they are currently seeing in their own communities. Note: ACF Regions 5 &...More Info >>
*/ 4 of 4 Survivor Centered Webinar Series on Sex Trafficking of Native WomenMore Info >>
In Native cultures, Native peoples had non-violent life ways based on an understanding of the natural world, viewing health through the traditional concepts of balance and sense of well-being. This webinar will discuss how restoring traditional family values can support positive social change and healthy community characteristics where Native families can exist in a web of relationships, each equal in importance and value. Presented by Theda New Breast, MPH, Native Wellness Institute */More Info >>
*/ 3 of 4 Survivor Centered Webinar Series on Sex Trafficking of Native WomenMore Info >>
*/ 2 of 4 Survivor Centered Webinar Series on Sex Trafficking of Native Women This webinar will address intimate partner sex trafficking, particularly how pimps select their victims. The focus will be on predator behavior, not victim risk factors. Presenters: Christine Stark (Cherokee/Anishinaabe is an award winning author, speaker, organizer, and visual artist. Her articles have been published in numerous journals and anthologies, including Prostitution, Trafficking, and Traumatic Stress and others. Currently, she is writing a report titled “Gathering Our Stories: the Prostitution and Trafficking of Native Women on the Duluth Ships” based upon interviews she conducted with Native women...More Info >>
Experiencing Domestic Violence and other multiple forms of abuse and oppression affects how we think and feel and sets the basis for our relationships with family, friends, community and service providers. This webinar will provide a holistic and integrated framework for responding to trauma and mental health in the context of domestic violence. It will look at the critical role of trauma-informed care in supporting healing and resiliency, both individual and community; and how a trauma-informed approach can strengthen and enhance advocacy work by increasing understanding of the psychological consequences of individual, collective and historical trauma and how this understanding...More Info >>

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