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NIWRC’s Resource Library includes resources developed and produced by NIWRC, as well as various resources from other outside sources. We encourage you to explore and utilize these resources, using the “Resource Topic” and “Search” tool bar below.

With regard to NIWRC produced resources, our NIWRC staff and consultants develop and produce culturally appropriate resources for tribes and advocates working on issues of violence against Native women such as domestic violence, teen dating violence, sexual assault, trafficking, missing and murdered Indigenous women, and more. These resources include webinars, special collections, booklets, fact sheets, research papers, videos, toolkits, reports, training curriculum and materials, among many other supporting documents.

NIWRC produced resources may be repurposed or reproduced as long as NIWRC is cited as the source. For additional technical assistance, we encourage you to connect with NIWRC staff through our online contact form. You can also view resources on NIWRC's Advocate! mobile app or view our dedicated video channel.

This webinar will address the multitude of factors that affect the safety and well-being of women and children living with domestic violence. This webinar will try to help society understand why we need to shift our focus from asking why women stay to asking “Why do men abuse women?” */More Info >>
Strangulation has been identified as one of the most lethal forms of domestic violence and sexual assault. This session will provide an in-depth examination of the mechanics of strangulation and suffocation from a legal and law enforcement perspective. */More Info >>
*/ Strangulation has been identified as one of the most lethal forms of domestic violence and sexual assault. This session will provide an in-depth examination of the mechanics of strangulation and suffocation from a legal and law enforcement perspective.More Info >>
One control tactic used by abuses involves controlling the finances of the household. Abusers may limit the survivor’s options by not allowing access to checking accounts, credit card, other sources of money or even financial independence. Our society tends to focus on getting the survivor away from the perpetrator, but we provide very little in the way of financial assistance to allow her to remain financially independent. This session will provide information about economic abuse and emerging practices or programs addressing this serious issue. */More Info >>
Colonizing governments understood that to establish their control over Native nations, they had to work to eradicate tribal values that honored women and prohibited violence against women. Today, the pathways to ending violence against Native women must be grounded firmly in reconnecting with these tribal values. One Nation at a time, through community organizing efforts to reconnect with tribal values, we can change how we think about our responsibilities of protecting our women and implement concrete solutions. */More Info >>
This resource offers a basic outline for the development of shelters and advocacy programs serving Native women who are battered or raped and their children. It provides an overall picture of elements and steps necessary in establishing a shelter. This booklet also inspires critical thinking and dialogue about the assumptions we bring to our work to stop violence against Native women. 54 pgs. Purchase printed handbook.More Info >>
One of Sacred Circle’s most popular public education publications, this booklet provides an analysis of why Native women are the most victimized group of women in the United States. This booklet can be used in a wide variety of settings and is an excellent resource for individuals and families seeking a working understanding of the causes and dynamics of violence against Native women Purchase printed handbook.More Info >>
*/ A documentary about the Native American women raped in Indian reserves. This doc fails to address the colonial context that directly produces these high rape rates. With the Native people's forced cultural assimilation, mass kidnapping and brainwashing in colonial schools, also came the assimilation of western values -including patriarchal oppression- that sets the foundation for the suppression of the feminine. The Sioux nations featured in this presentation traditionally are, and have been a matriarchal culture. With crimes such as rape being non-existent. These "post" colonial high rape rates are a result of being colonized and demoralized, and expressed through...More Info >>
Even in the 21st century, victim blaming is alive and well in Indian country. Just last year, an Indian Health Service (IHS) physician published a paper in which she recommended that victims be lumped into categories such as “unintentional game players” and “intentional game players.” She recommended these harsh labels “to shed light on the experience of domestic violence in many American Indian communities” (MacEachen, 2003, p. 126). Even more amazingly, MacEachen (2003) suggested that women with a history of child sexual abuse often “provoke rape and battery in order to satisfy [their] needs …” (p. 127). The stubborn persistence...More Info >>

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