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Our Resource Library includes resources developed and produced by NIWRC, as well as various resources from other outside sources. We encourage you to explore and utilize these resources, using the 'Resource Topic' and 'Search' toolbar below. With regard to NIWRC produced resources, our NIWRC staff and consultants develop and produce culturally appropriate resources to support Tribes, Tribal programs and advocates working on issues of violence against Native women. These resources include webinars, special collections, booklets, fact sheets, research papers, videos, toolkits, reports, training curriculum and materials, among many other supporting documents. NIWRC produced resources may be repurposed or reproduced as long as NIWRC is cited as the source. You can also view resources on NIWRC's Advocate! mobile app or view our dedicated video channel.

Quick Search: Advocacy | Children | Domestic Violence | FVPSA | Health and Wellness | MMIW | Sexual Assault | Sex Trafficking | Shelter | VAWA

To request technical assistance on a specific resource, please connect with NIWRC staff through our Contact Us page.

Download Report By Sovereign Bodies Institute: "To’ Kee Skuy’ Soo Ney-Wo-Chek’ addresses the severe impact of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and two spirit people (MMIWG2) and trafficking of Native people in Northern California, defined as from the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento up to the Oregon border. We set out to collect data, set up protocols, and use the data to create a justice system which speaks to the needs of the community in a healing way, all the while addressing the need for swift justice in areas where women and girls are vulnerable. Specifically, To’ Kee...More Info >>
The hardships imposed by COVID-19 are numerous, impacting advocates as individuals and their ability to provide advocacy, resources and shelter to domestic violence survivors. Stay-At-Home orders, social distancing and the other necessary steps intended to offer protection from COVID-19, often escalate the danger to victims of domestic violence and create barriers to safety. This webinar explores strategies advocates have created to navigate the challenges of the pandemic, including issues of self-care, shortages of personal protective equipment, outreach, crisis response, shelter and law enforcement and justice systems responses. With no end date in sight for the pandemic, long-term strategies are key...More Info >>, div.sap-embed-player{position:relative;width:100%;height:0;padding-top:56.25%;}div.sap-embed-player>iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%;}More Info >>
Statistics, and information on domestic violence, and human trafficking in Native Hawaiian communities by the Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based ViolenceMore Info >>
Privacy, confidentiality and privileged communications are the keystones to safety for survivors of battering or domestic violence. Protecting privacy and confidentiality of victims of domestic violence is directly related to a survivor’s ability to trust, ask for advocacy, support and help. The law provides certain protections to conversations referred to as “privileged communications” between two individuals. All of these protections are important to understand as well as any legal limitations that local laws may impose. This booklet will provide basic guidance for advocates and shelter programs to understand and implement or integrate these practices for the protection of those who...More Info >>
Does your program or tribe need help creating materials promoting non-violence against Native women and children? Review our 19 x 13” inch posters and 11 x 3.5” inch bumper stickers that your organization can download and customize to fit your needs. All materials listed here are provided under this Creative Commons 4.0 Public License . We would love to know how these materials are being used, so please send us a link to your final products . You will need : - Adobe Illustrator CS6 + - Contact information for printing companies for estimates - Budget for printing of materials...More Info >>
//--> //--> INTRODUCTION This Special Collection is developed to support cultural competency/humility initiatives, and educational or research projects requiring Native specific information and resources. The Special Collection provides background reading, research, organizational information, ally-building and cultural competency resources focused on Indian Country and domestic and sexual violence. This Collection includes recommended readings on: Domestic & Sexual Violence Against Native Women & Children, Action Guidance, Indigenous/Native/Tribal Domestic & Sexual Violence Resource Centers, and Indigenous/Tribal Organizations and Ally-Building-Cultural Competency/Humility-Anti-oppression Trainers/Consultants resources . The section titled Sovereignty, Federal Law & Jurisdictional Issues is unique and integral to work within Indian Country. Unlike other...More Info >>
This booklet, "Strong Families Respect Each Other: What Native Youth Need to Know About the Connection Between Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence" (12 pages) was produced by NIWRC in partnership with the Native Youth Sexual Health Network . This booklet contains definitions on domestic violence and sexual assault, examples of sexual assault, myths and truths about sexual assault, what to do if you have been sexually assaulted, what to do if you know or think a friend or family member has experienced sexual assault, our power as life-givers and cool apps that can help prevent violence. Order printed copies.More Info >>
This booklet, " Strong Families Respect Each Other: What Native Youth Need to Know About Domestic Violence" (14 pages) was produced by NIWRC in partnership with the Native Youth Sexual Health Network . This booklet contains definitions on domestic violence, examples of controlling violence, what to do if you're experiencing domestic violence in any form, for family and friends of people experiencing domestic violence and how Native youth can lead the change to break the silence around domestic violence in their communities. Order printed copies.More Info >>
INTRODUCTION This Special Collection is a new video resource initiative of the NIWRC, a project inspired by the national TED Talks: Ideas Worth Spreading. WAS Talks was launched and recorded during the June 2018 Women Are Sacred Conference. The special collection is developed to highlight the issues, resources and other suggestions by tribal survivors, advocates, researchers, legal community, social workers, law enforcement, community/family members, child welfare workers, philosophers, community leaders, politicians and tribal leaders. The Special Collection organizes fifteen women in attendance at the 2018 Women Are Sacred conference, who shared their stories, spoke their truth and healing. Our tribal...More Info >>
*/ /*--> */ Title: Fostering Resilience in Children Traumatized by Domestic Violence in Collaboration with their Non-offending Parent Description: FVPSA event in collaboration with NIWRC There are often lifelong and devastating consequences for children who have been traumatized by witnessing domestic violence against a parent or caregiver. Trauma can lead to challenging and misunderstood behaviors and emotions in children. These behaviors often result in damaging labeling and inappropriate or negative responses [from others?]. This webinar considers ways to recognize how trauma impacts children and offers ways to support healing and resiliency to them in collaboration with their parent. Inter-generational trauma...More Info >>
This webinar will address the importance of confidentiality between victim advocates and survivors, and the policy and social science rationales for victim advocates establishing and maintaining protocols around these communications. Victim advocates will learn about confidentiality, privileged communications, written informed consent protocols, the laws addressing these communications, and how to respond to tribal court-related requests for confidential or privileged communications. Victim advocates will learn about necessary procedures, forms, and other tools and resources that will help them protect survivor autonomy, while working effectively with tribal court systems and related personnel. Presented by: Rob (Roberta) Valente Domestic Violence Policy & Advocacy...More Info >>
The 2019 Women Are Sacred calendar includes awareness months and days reflecting the safety for Native women movement along with beautiful color photographs, artwork and images. Awareness months and days include introductions, definitions and resources on Human Trafficking Awareness Month, National stalking Awareness Month, Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Child Abuse Prevention Month, National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, Domestic Violence Awareness Month and International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Print Instructions: Send PDF to local or online printer for quality print...More Info >>
VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. We hope that our Tribal Coalitions will join this webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues so that together we can address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women. Tribal Coalitions are in a unique position to prepare tribal leaders regarding national and local recommendations...More Info >>
This timely and important webinar will provide an overview of what is known about the opioid epidemic and will focus on the specific concerns of Indian communities and tribal domestic violence programs and shelters. It will lay the foundation for the exploding opioid epidemic and will examine the intersections between trauma, domestic violence and the opioid epidemic and explore innovative approaches to addressing these complex issues. */ /*--> */More Info >>
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Five years ago, Congress passed the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA 2013). 2 In response to the high rates of domestic violence being perpetrated against American Indian and Alaska Native women by non-Indian men, i and harrowing stories from victims whose abusers seemed out of justice’s reach, the law contained a new provision. VAWA 2013 recognized and affirmed the inherent sovereign authority of Indian tribal governments to exercise criminal jurisdiction over certain non-Indians who violate qualifying protection orders or commit domestic or dating violence against Indian victims on tribal lands. 3 This provision in VAWA...More Info >>
This brochure gives women a guide for enhancing their personal safety and that of family members, while outlining tactics of power and control over women. The Safety Guide is also useful in community education efforts. The Safety Guide is also available for purchase.More Info >>
As we, the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, honor 30 years of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) during the month of October, we are thankful for every one of our relatives and allies that make up this national movement to end violence against women and children. In October 1987, advocates recognized the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month and the first national toll-free hotline for domestic violence, the National Domestic Violence Hotline, began taking calls. Two years later, Congress passed the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month Commemorative legislation, which has recognized DVAM every year since then. As we reflect on the...More Info >>
Methamphetamine has been identified as one of the largest threats to public safety in Indian Country. Tribal sources have attributed it to higher rates of domestic violence, assaults, burglaries, and child abuse and neglect on reservations and in tribal communities. 74% of tribal police forces rank meth as the greatest drug threat to their communities; 40-50% of violent crime cases investigated by the FBI in Indian country involve meth in some capacity; and 64% of tribal police indicate an increase in domestic violence and assault/battery. The complex nature of criminal jurisdiction on Indian reservations, along with historically under funded and...More Info >>
Tribal Access Project: Information Sharing and Access to Federal Databases. Tribes can more effectively serve and protect victims of domestic and sexual violence by having full access to critical data across the Criminal Justice Information Services systems and other national criminal information systems. This webinar session will provide an update on the Tribal Access Project (TAP) that the U.S. Department of Justice launched to support tribal efforts to have orders of protection enforced outside their reservations, keep guns out of the wrong hands, register sex offenders, and allow tribes to have tribal arrests and tribal convictions be associated with their...More Info >>

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