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Webinar

Webinar: Domestic Violence and Disabilities

We know that American Indian/Alaska Native women experience some of the highest rates for domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, sex trafficking, homicide at the hands of an intimate partner, and missing & murdered.  Women with disabilities are of double risk for violence and abuse.  This webinar will offer data on American Indian/Alaska Native disabilities in equal access, fair accommodations, and an opportunity to make powerful contributions to provide accessible, safe, and effective services to individuals with disabilities and Deaf individuals who are victims of sexual assault

Webinar: Providing Safety for Domestic Violence Survivors in the Time of a Pandemic

The hardships imposed by COVID-19 are numerous, impacting advocates as individuals and their ability to provide advocacy, resources and shelter to domestic violence survivors. Stay-At-Home orders, social distancing and the other necessary steps intended to offer protection from COVID-19, often escalate the danger to victims of domestic violence and create barriers to safety.

Webinar: Trauma-Informed Advocacy in the Time of a Pandemic

Our whole world has changed, our whole way of life has been put on hold. These are truly trying and difficult times for so many people. Tribal domestic violence advocates are struggling to find their footing and respond as best they can under the circumstances, given the lack of resources, tribal infrastructures and an increase in domestic violence. Indigenous people and Tribal Nations experience multiple levels of trauma, including Historical Trauma. All this contributes to our response to the current pandemic.

Webinar: Tribal Consultation on Violence Against Indian Women (VAWA 2013, Section 903)

VAWA 2005 requires the DOJ, HHS, and DOI to engage in formal consultation with Indian tribes on an annual basis to address concerns that impact the safety of Indian women at the broadest level. Participation in this nation-to-nation consultation is critically important for tribal leaders to dialogue with government officials about solutions and strategies to address issues related to violence against Native women.

Webinar: Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls - National Day of Action, May 5, 2020

During the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. In 2005, the movement for safety of Native women resulted in the inclusion of the “Safety for Indian Women” title within the Violence Against Women Act. A study released by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average.

Webinar: Domestic Violence and Pets

There is a clear and established link between animal cruelty and human violence. This webinar will focus on implications for pets in the context of domestic violence. This is important since studies have shown that 48% of domestic violence victims delay leaving or remain in abusive situations because of their pets.  Yet fewer than 10% of domestic violence shelters house pets and almost half of all victim/survivors do not want to be separated from their pets.

Webinar: Disaster Planning for Tribal Domestic Violence Programs and Shelters

When disaster strikes, are you prepared? This webinar will focus on how we, as tribal domestic violence programs and shelters can prepare and insure our ability to conduct business after a disaster strikes.  It will not only address personal preparedness, but important information on how to continue critical operations of tribal domestic violence programs.  It will provide emergency management tips to help tribal domestic violence programs be prepared for future disasters and continue the vital role you play in our communities: Protecting our Relatives!

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Webinar: Women Are Sacred: Exploring Women’s Spirituality from an Indigenous Perspective

This webinar provides a rare opportunity to reflect upon the meaning of the sacredness of women. Especially, in the face of the impact of colonization and modern day levels of violence against native women, how do we, as indigenous women, experience, understand, nurture and protect our sacredness? What are some of our traditional practices and teachings that can help us embrace indigenous women’s spirituality to decolonize, help each other heal and revitalize our sacredness?

Presenters: Cheryl Neskahi Coan, Amanda Takes War Bonnett, Rose “Loke” Pettigrew, Lenora “Lynne” Hootch

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