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Tribal Consultation on Violence Against Women 2017: Why Attendance of Indian Tribes Is Urgent

VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. The report from the 2016 consultation is available here.

Updates on International Advocacy to Restore Safety for Indigenous Women - TDVSAC webinar

While advocacy on the domestic level is vital, violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women also has implications in the international arena. Violence against women is a pervasive human rights violation and the situation indigenous women face is particularly dire. International experts have found that indigenous women often suffer disproportionate and multiple forms of violence and higher rates of murder than other women. Advocacy at the international level can complement and strengthen advocacy efforts on the domestic level.

Addressing Tribal Victims of Crime

The National Congress of American Indians Task Force on Violence Against Women will provide an update on efforts to remove barriers preventing American Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages from accessing the Crime Victim Fund. Unlike state and territorial governments, tribal governments do not receive an annual allocation from the Crime Victims Fund to help crime victims in their communities.

Preventing Multiple Forms of Violence: A Strategic Vision for Connecting the Dots

This document communicates CDC’s priorities related to violence prevention for the next 5 years. CDC will use this document to prioritize our portfolio of work to better address the connections among the different forms of violence, shape future funding initiatives, and guide our collaborative efforts with partners across the country.
Why use a cross-cutting approach?

ICWA and VAWA: Preserving Tribal Sovereignty to Protect our Women and Children

Both the Indian Child Welfare Act and the Violence Against Women Act tribal jurisdiction provision (section 904) recognize the inherent sovereignty of Indian Nations to protect their women and children.  However, both are under attack.  This webinar will take a close look at the non-Indian attacks on ICWA and VAWA, how they intersect, and what lessons we can learn from defending these attacks to ensure that our own communities best utilize these important laws to protect our women and children.

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