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Missing and Murdered Native Women

Naniawig Mamawe Ninawind - Stand with Us - October 2016

In 2014, the Quebec Native Women’s association was granted a small amount of money from the Quebec Ministry of Justice to work on the issue of MMIW in the province. Before moving forward though, our organization insisted that the question of MMIW in Quebec had not yet been documented, and needed to be in order to insure appropriate and adapted intervention. As such, the organization hired an Indigenous research assistant, and together, Annie Bergeron and Alana Boileau interviewed over fifty people to explore the matter of MMIW in the French speaking province.

Missing and Murdered Native Women – Public Awareness Efforts

In 2005, the national movement for the safety of Native women led the struggle to include in the Violence Against Women Act a separate title for Native women called Safety for Native Women. One of the findings that justified creation of the title was that during the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S.

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