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Alcohol and Sexual Violence Perpetration Antonia Abbey With Contributions from Lydia Guy Ortiz This paper summarizes the research literature that examines alcohol’s role in sexual violence perpetration. The first section provides estimates of the frequency with which alcohol consumption and sexual assault perpetration co-occur. After describing the criteria required to determine that one variable causes change in another, relevant experimental and survey research are critically reviewed. The final section includes suggestions for practitioners based on available scientific knowledge.More Info >>
Pornography and Sexual Violence Robert Jensen With contributions from Debbie Okrina Given the epidemic levels of sexual violence and the widespread availability of increasingly graphic pornography in the United States, it is not surprising that researchers and activists have tried to answer the question of whether there is a connection between men’s use of pornography and sexual violence. Since legal controls on sexually explicit material began to loosen dramatically in the 1970s and the issue attained a new visibility, a variety of different methods have been used to try to answer that question, or at least provide clues to the...More Info >>
Even in the 21st century, victim blaming is alive and well in Indian country. Just last year, an Indian Health Service (IHS) physician published a paper in which she recommended that victims be lumped into categories such as “unintentional game players” and “intentional game players.” She recommended these harsh labels “to shed light on the experience of domestic violence in many American Indian communities” (MacEachen, 2003, p. 126). Even more amazingly, MacEachen (2003) suggested that women with a history of child sexual abuse often “provoke rape and battery in order to satisfy [their] needs …” (p. 127). The stubborn persistence...More Info >>
Sexual Assault In Rural Communities Susan H. Lewis With contributions from Ellen Reed When sexually assaulted in a rural community, victims often find that opportunities for medical, legal or emotional services are very limited, or even nonexistent. Their economic situation and geographic isolation may further limit their options. Strong community ties in rural areas mean that a victim is more likely to be acquainted with the perpetrator than in urban settings. Finally, rural culture tends to be close-knit, self-contained, often conservative and unlikely to turn to “outsiders” for assistance. Together these characteristics result in low rates of reporting, limited opportunities...More Info >>
By Rebecca St. George Mending the Sacred Hoop STOP Violence Against Indian Women Technical Assistance Project, Duluth, MN Published: February 2001 Copyright © 2001 Mending the Sacred Hoop STOP Violence Against Indian Women Technical Assistance ProjectMore Info >>

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