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As we, the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, honor 30 years of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) during the month of October, we are thankful for every one of our relatives and allies that make up this national movement to end violence against women and children. In October 1987, advocates recognized the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month and the first national toll-free hotline for domestic violence, the National Domestic Violence Hotline, began taking calls. Two years later, Congress passed the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month Commemorative legislation, which has recognized DVAM every year since then. As we reflect on the...More Info >>
Methamphetamine has been identified as one of the largest threats to public safety in Indian Country. Tribal sources have attributed it to higher rates of domestic violence, assaults, burglaries, and child abuse and neglect on reservations and in tribal communities. 74% of tribal police forces rank meth as the greatest drug threat to their communities; 40-50% of violent crime cases investigated by the FBI in Indian country involve meth in some capacity; and 64% of tribal police indicate an increase in domestic violence and assault/battery. The complex nature of criminal jurisdiction on Indian reservations, along with historically under funded and...More Info >>
Tribal Access Project: Information Sharing and Access to Federal Databases. Tribes can more effectively serve and protect victims of domestic and sexual violence by having full access to critical data across the Criminal Justice Information Services systems and other national criminal information systems. This webinar session will provide an update on the Tribal Access Project (TAP) that the U.S. Department of Justice launched to support tribal efforts to have orders of protection enforced outside their reservations, keep guns out of the wrong hands, register sex offenders, and allow tribes to have tribal arrests and tribal convictions be associated with their...More Info >>
Does your program or tribe need some help creating materials promoting non-violence against Native women and children? Review our current 19 x13in Posters and 11 x 3.5in Bumper Stickers that your organization can customize to fit your needs. All materials listed here are provided under this Creative Commons 4.0 Public Licence . We would love to know how these materials are being used, so please send us a link to your final products . You will need: Adobe Illustrator CS6 + Locate your own printing company (suggestions provided below). Pay for your own printing of materials. Customize Capabilities: Download this...More Info >>
2016 Excellence in Journalism Conference (EIJ16) Session Information: Covering Domestic Violence Against Native Women. Native women suffer from violence at a rate two and a half times greater than that of any other population in the United States. One in three Native women will be raped in her lifetime; four in five will be victims of a violent assault. Join the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) and a panel of Native journalists covering domestic violence for a discussion on the legal and ethical ramifications for journalists covering this topic. Includes: shared practices, common challenges and perspectives on why it’s...More Info >>
Connecting the Dots: An Overview of the Links Among Multiple Forms of Violence is a publication of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Prevention Institute. Violence takes many forms, including intimate partner violence, sexual violence, child maltreatment, bullying, suicidal behavior, and elder abuse and neglect. These forms of violence are interconnected and often share the same root causes. They can also all take place under one roof, or in a given community or neighborhood and can happen at the same time or at different stages of life.1,2 Understanding the overlapping causes of violence and the things that can...More Info >>
Native women have been leaders among their peoples since time immemorial, maintaining community wellness and teaching cultural values and life-ways for thousands of years. Today’s Native women are no exception—when we work to create positive strides in the health, wellbeing, and sovereignty of our Nations, we walk in the footsteps of our grandmothers who came before us. This year, we choose to celebrate Native American Heritage Month by honoring some of these grandmothers and sharing their stories on our Facebook page . From Queen Lili’uokalani to Lozen, these women are leaders in a wide variety of fields—education, literature, arts, language...More Info >>
This webinar provides an overview of the Full Frame Initiative’s project (FFI) to understand how people who have experienced domestic violence define success for themselves, and how others in the domestic violence field define success for survivors. Over two and a half years, FFI conducted 46 workshops with survivors and practitioners in mainstream, culturally specific and underserved communities, and 12 interviews with policy makers and funders, across California. For the more than 150 survivors in this project, success is about connection to family and friends, belonging to something bigger than oneself, and creating value for self and others. Domestic violence...More Info >>
This webinar will address the multitude of factors that affect the safety and well-being of women and children living with domestic violence. This webinar will try to help society understand why we need to shift our focus from asking why women stay to asking “Why do men abuse women?” */More Info >>
Strangulation has been identified as one of the most lethal forms of domestic violence and sexual assault. This session will provide an in-depth examination of the mechanics of strangulation and suffocation from a legal and law enforcement perspective. */More Info >>
*/ Strangulation has been identified as one of the most lethal forms of domestic violence and sexual assault. This session will provide an in-depth examination of the mechanics of strangulation and suffocation from a legal and law enforcement perspective.More Info >>
One control tactic used by abuses involves controlling the finances of the household. Abusers may limit the survivor’s options by not allowing access to checking accounts, credit card, other sources of money or even financial independence. Our society tends to focus on getting the survivor away from the perpetrator, but we provide very little in the way of financial assistance to allow her to remain financially independent. This session will provide information about economic abuse and emerging practices or programs addressing this serious issue. */More Info >>
Colonizing governments understood that to establish their control over Native nations, they had to work to eradicate tribal values that honored women and prohibited violence against women. Today, the pathways to ending violence against Native women must be grounded firmly in reconnecting with these tribal values. One Nation at a time, through community organizing efforts to reconnect with tribal values, we can change how we think about our responsibilities of protecting our women and implement concrete solutions. */More Info >>
This resource offers a basic outline for the development of shelters and advocacy programs serving Native women who are battered or raped and their children. It provides an overall picture of elements and steps necessary in establishing a shelter. This booklet also inspires critical thinking and dialogue about the assumptions we bring to our work to stop violence against Native women. 54 pgs. Purchase printed handbook.More Info >>

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