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*/ Honoring Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women to Guide our Advocacy for Change During the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. In 2005, the movement for safety of Native women resulted in the “Safety for Indian Women” being included under the Violence Against Women Act. A study released by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average. Over...More Info >>
INTRODUCTION This Special Collection is developed to highlight the issues, concerns, reccomendations and resources for addressing Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) within our communities. The Special Collection organizes information, resources, tips and curricula drawn from the wealth of information gathered from partner organizations, experts from the field, and other allies from the web. More specifically, this toolkit will house resources on cultural issues, national sources, statistics, topical issues and approaches, existing programs, and available material and resources to create awareness and promote important discussions about MMIWG. This collection will expand as resources and new information become available...More Info >>
The 2019 Women Are Sacred calendar includes awareness months and days reflecting the safety for Native women movement along with beautiful color photographs, artwork and images. Awareness months and days include introductions, definitions and resources on Human Trafficking Awareness Month, National stalking Awareness Month, Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Child Abuse Prevention Month, National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, Domestic Violence Awareness Month and International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Print Instructions: Send PDF to local or online printer for quality print...More Info >>
Coping with the disappearance of a loved one or community member is very difficult. The fact that American Indian and Alaska Native women experience higher rates of domestic violence and sexual assault than any other population of women in the United States has broad ramifications. One consequence of this reality is that domestic and sexual violence occurs on a spectrum of abusive behavior and can include abduction and murder. If a woman you know is missing, taking immediate action is very important. The quicker you respond, the faster she may be located and provided the help needed.More Info >>
The number of missing and unidentified persons in the United States poses one of the biggest challenges to law enforcement, medical examiners, and coroners tasked with resolving these important cases. The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) is a national information clearinghouse and resource center which offers technology, forensic services, and investigative support to help resolve cases. Funded by the National Institute of Justice and managed through a cooperative agreement with the UNT Health Science Center, NamUs offers all services at no cost to agencies or families of the missing. The online NamUs databases are accessible to all, with...More Info >>
In 2005, the movement for the safety of Native women led the struggle to include under the Violence Against Women Act a separate title for Native women called Safety for Indian Women. One of the findings of this title was that during the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than...More Info >>
Tribal Access Project: Information Sharing and Access to Federal Databases. Tribes can more effectively serve and protect victims of domestic and sexual violence by having full access to critical data across the Criminal Justice Information Services systems and other national criminal information systems. This webinar session will provide an update on the Tribal Access Project (TAP) that the U.S. Department of Justice launched to support tribal efforts to have orders of protection enforced outside their reservations, keep guns out of the wrong hands, register sex offenders, and allow tribes to have tribal arrests and tribal convictions be associated with their...More Info >>
In 2005, the national movement for the safety of Native women led the struggle to include in the Violence Against Women Act a separate title for Native women called Safety for Native Women. One of the findings that justified creation of the title was that during the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates...More Info >>
In 2014, the Quebec Native Women’s association was granted a small amount of money from the Quebec Ministry of Justice to work on the issue of MMIW in the province. Before moving forward though, our organization insisted that the question of MMIW in Quebec had not yet been documented, and needed to be in order to insure appropriate and adapted intervention. As such, the organization hired an Indigenous research assistant, and together, Annie Bergeron and Alana Boileau interviewed over fifty people to explore the matter of MMIW in the French speaking province. Frontline workers, justice file holders, First Nations police,...More Info >>