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This webinar will provide updates on recent VAWA reauthorization efforts and the importance of continued advocacy for a permanent VOCA fix for a dedicated tribal funding stream under the Crime Victims Fund (CVF). While a historic victory was achieved by the provision of tribal funding under the CVF in the FY 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill, the Department of Justice is pressed to award $133 million to Indian tribes before September 30, 2018. Discussion will also focus on concerns and challenges the timing of this award presents for tribes. Tribal grassroots organizing efforts have been and will continue to play a...More Info >>
In 2013, the Violence Against Women Act was reauthorized. This reauthorization included new amendments that directly impacted tribal communities and victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, dating violence and stalking. This webinar will give an overview of Title IX of the Violence Against Women Act. Facilitators, Jacqueline Agtuca and Caroline LaPorte will go through Title IX section by section to provide tribal coalitions with a foundational review of VAWA Title IX, including important consultation mandates and processes for change. */More Info >>
For many remote Indian communities, it often is difficult to create, develop and sustain trauma-informed and culturally appropriate services and resources as part of a health response for Indigenous women who have been sexually violated. Sexual assault nurse examiners (SANE) have specialized training, education, and experience in providing quality forensic medical examinations and patient-centered care to survivors. Given high medical staff turnover, it is challenging to keep SANE nurses on staff in tribal community health care facilities. Join us for this webinar to learn how the National TeleNursing Center, Hopi Health Care Center, National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, and Hopi-Tewa...More Info >>
Understanding the scope of sexual assaults committed against American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) within the context of intimate partner relationships and supporting timely tribal government responses can help reduce the trauma experienced by Native victim survivors of sexual assault. This webinar will focus on historical and contemporary sexual violence experienced by AI/ANs and share policy recommendations focused on the intersection of sexual assault and the related crimes of domestic violence and other related issues and limitations faced by tribal nations. The webinar aims to reduce disparities in the response to sexual assault of tribal victims by increasing awareness of...More Info >>
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Five years ago, Congress passed the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA 2013). 2 In response to the high rates of domestic violence being perpetrated against American Indian and Alaska Native women by non-Indian men, i and harrowing stories from victims whose abusers seemed out of justice’s reach, the law contained a new provision. VAWA 2013 recognized and affirmed the inherent sovereign authority of Indian tribal governments to exercise criminal jurisdiction over certain non-Indians who violate qualifying protection orders or commit domestic or dating violence against Indian victims on tribal lands. 3 This provision in VAWA...More Info >>
This brochure gives women a guide for enhancing their personal safety and that of family members, while outlining tactics of power and control over women. The Safety Guide is also useful in community education efforts. The Safety Guide is also available for purchase.More Info >>
Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month (TDVAM) is a national effort to raise awareness and protect teens from violence. How can you make a difference? By encouraging your school, community-based organizations, tribal leaders, parents, and teens to join together to prevent teen dating violence– both at home and in our communities. Those of us in Native communities often hear jokes about “Indian lovin” as waking up with a hickey and a black eye—that’s not love, it’s dating violence. The NativeLove project gives us the opportunity to reframe what NativeLove really is, so we can change our thoughts and actions to restore...More Info >>
Effective financial management of non-profit organizations is an ongoing process of infusing good management habits. No matter how small your tribal coalition, a good financial management system helps ensure adequate internal controls, accurate accounting, and quality reporting. When staff and board are meeting their fiscal responsibilities, it helps the organization sustain for the long term to achieve its important mission. This webinar will seek to enhance the financial literacy of tribal coalition staff and boards, focusing first on providing an overview of CPA services and when each is applicable to an organization, then defining a Single Audit and its requirements...More Info >>
This webinar will provide an overview of the current federal laws in place regarding shelter and housing in Indian Country and the responsibilities expressly outlined in the Violence Against Women Act. The webinar will also focus on the disparity in tribal housing and shelter in Native communities; will review ONAP’s recent report; and will give an overview of why victims of abuse need access to housing as a matter of survival. Participants will learn about HUD’s final rule and its application to Indian Country housing and shelter options. This webinar will also explore culturally responsive best promising practices to promote...More Info >>
The number of missing and unidentified persons in the United States poses one of the biggest challenges to law enforcement, medical examiners, and coroners tasked with resolving these important cases. The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) is a national information clearinghouse and resource center which offers technology, forensic services, and investigative support to help resolve cases. Funded by the National Institute of Justice and managed through a cooperative agreement with the UNT Health Science Center, NamUs offers all services at no cost to agencies or families of the missing. The online NamUs databases are accessible to all, with...More Info >>
American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have the highest crime victimization rates in the nation and often have difficulty connecting with victim services. AI/AN victims of crime face additional challenges such as navigating complex jurisdiction barriers and a dearth of culturally appropriate services, both on and off tribal lands. On January 1, 2016, the Office for Victims of Crime of the U.S. Department of Justice funded the National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC), National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), and the Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) to work together and create a web-based tribal resource mapping tool that...More Info >>
*/ The Rosebud Sioux Tribe was one of the first tribes in the country selected to participate in the Defending Childhood Initiative, raising awareness about children’s exposure to violence. A youth group, born out of this initiative, visited the Carlisle Indian School several years ago. They were shocked to see Sicangu names on some of the headstones in the cemetery. They wanted to bring their relatives home and thus began a long journey of repatriation to identify, remove and re-bury the remains of at least 10 Native American children who died more than a century ago at Carlisle Indian school...More Info >>
The Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) was enacted in 1984 and established the Crime Victims Fund (CVF or Fund). The CVF is unique in that it is funded only through the collection of criminal fines, forfeited appearance bonds, penalties, and assessments. These dollars derive from offenders convicted of federal crimes and resulting fines and penalties; not taxpayers. While Congress does not appropriate funds for VOCA it does determine how much can be released or distributed each year from the CVF. The 2013 balance of the CVF was over $13 billion.More Info >>
As we, the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, honor 30 years of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) during the month of October, we are thankful for every one of our relatives and allies that make up this national movement to end violence against women and children. In October 1987, advocates recognized the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month and the first national toll-free hotline for domestic violence, the National Domestic Violence Hotline, began taking calls. Two years later, Congress passed the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month Commemorative legislation, which has recognized DVAM every year since then. As we reflect on the...More Info >>
*/ VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. The report from the 2016 consultation is available here. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase...More Info >>
The Violence Against Women Act, 1994-2013 - Fact Sheet The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), originally sponsored by Senators Biden and Hatch, was enacted in 1994 as a result of national grassroots organizing by battered women and advocates. These efforts included Indian women who organized to engage tribal, state, and federal systems to hold governments accountable to address the nationwide statistics, crisis, and seriousness of sexual assault, stalking and domestic violence committed against women. The Act’s passage marked the federal government’s acknowledgment of the extent and pervasiveness of violence against women and the need for more dedicated services for victims...More Info >>
Family Violence Prevention and Services Act - Fact Sheet BACKGROUND FVPSA is the primary federal funding source dedicated to supporting immediate shelter and supportive services for victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence and their dependents. Administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children, Youth and Families, FVPSA supports these activities through state and tribal shelter programs, state domestic violence coalitions, training and technical assistance service providers and the National Domestic Violence Hotline.More Info >>
*/ Indigenous advocates have played a critical role in speaking out against violence and injustice. They have brought national attention to the diversity and unique needs in tribal communities. They have readily and thoughtfully informed national policy based on their own experience and the experiences of survivors, families and communities. They have taught us and continue to teach us to be good relatives and better human beings. They have continuously contributed to this ever-expanding movement to address the multitude and complexity of issues facing tribal nations, Indian communities and Alaska Native villages. Join us in listening to the voices of...More Info >>
Methamphetamine has been identified as one of the largest threats to public safety in Indian Country. Tribal sources have attributed it to higher rates of domestic violence, assaults, burglaries, and child abuse and neglect on reservations and in tribal communities. 74% of tribal police forces rank meth as the greatest drug threat to their communities; 40-50% of violent crime cases investigated by the FBI in Indian country involve meth in some capacity; and 64% of tribal police indicate an increase in domestic violence and assault/battery. The complex nature of criminal jurisdiction on Indian reservations, along with historically under funded and...More Info >>
In 2005, the movement for the safety of Native women led the struggle to include under the Violence Against Women Act a separate title for Native women called Safety for Indian Women. One of the findings of this title was that during the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than...More Info >>

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