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*/ The Rosebud Sioux Tribe was one of the first tribes in the country selected to participate in the Defending Childhood Initiative, raising awareness about children’s exposure to violence. A youth group, born out of this initiative, visited the Carlisle Indian School several years ago. They were shocked to see Sicangu names on some of the headstones in the cemetery. They wanted to bring their relatives home and thus began a long journey of repatriation to identify, remove and re-bury the remains of at least 10 Native American children who died more than a century ago at Carlisle Indian school...More Info >>
The Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) was enacted in 1984 and established the Crime Victims Fund (CVF or Fund). The CVF is unique in that it is funded only through the collection of criminal fines, forfeited appearance bonds, penalties, and assessments. These dollars derive from offenders convicted of federal crimes and resulting fines and penalties; not taxpayers. While Congress does not appropriate funds for VOCA it does determine how much can be released or distributed each year from the CVF. The 2013 balance of the CVF was over $13 billion.More Info >>
As we, the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, honor 30 years of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) during the month of October, we are thankful for every one of our relatives and allies that make up this national movement to end violence against women and children. In October 1987, advocates recognized the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month and the first national toll-free hotline for domestic violence, the National Domestic Violence Hotline, began taking calls. Two years later, Congress passed the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month Commemorative legislation, which has recognized DVAM every year since then. As we reflect on the...More Info >>
*/ VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. The report from the 2016 consultation is available here. We hope that you will join our webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase...More Info >>
The Violence Against Women Act, 1994-2013 - Fact Sheet The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), originally sponsored by Senators Biden and Hatch, was enacted in 1994 as a result of national grassroots organizing by battered women and advocates. These efforts included Indian women who organized to engage tribal, state, and federal systems to hold governments accountable to address the nationwide statistics, crisis, and seriousness of sexual assault, stalking and domestic violence committed against women. The Act’s passage marked the federal government’s acknowledgment of the extent and pervasiveness of violence against women and the need for more dedicated services for victims...More Info >>
Family Violence Prevention and Services Act - Fact Sheet BACKGROUND FVPSA is the primary federal funding source dedicated to supporting immediate shelter and supportive services for victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence and their dependents. Administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children, Youth and Families, FVPSA supports these activities through state and tribal shelter programs, state domestic violence coalitions, training and technical assistance service providers and the National Domestic Violence Hotline.More Info >>
*/ Indigenous advocates have played a critical role in speaking out against violence and injustice. They have brought national attention to the diversity and unique needs in tribal communities. They have readily and thoughtfully informed national policy based on their own experience and the experiences of survivors, families and communities. They have taught us and continue to teach us to be good relatives and better human beings. They have continuously contributed to this ever-expanding movement to address the multitude and complexity of issues facing tribal nations, Indian communities and Alaska Native villages. Join us in listening to the voices of...More Info >>
Methamphetamine has been identified as one of the largest threats to public safety in Indian Country. Tribal sources have attributed it to higher rates of domestic violence, assaults, burglaries, and child abuse and neglect on reservations and in tribal communities. 74% of tribal police forces rank meth as the greatest drug threat to their communities; 40-50% of violent crime cases investigated by the FBI in Indian country involve meth in some capacity; and 64% of tribal police indicate an increase in domestic violence and assault/battery. The complex nature of criminal jurisdiction on Indian reservations, along with historically under funded and...More Info >>
In 2005, the movement for the safety of Native women led the struggle to include under the Violence Against Women Act a separate title for Native women called Safety for Indian Women. One of the findings of this title was that during the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than...More Info >>
The goal for this webinar is for participants to engage in critical thinking about how their coalition/advocates and communities are actively practicing resiliency with youth who witness or experience domestic violence/intimate partner violence in their homes. Our panel consists of Victoria Sweet from NCJFCJ, Haley Merrill from CASA, Dr. Alaina Szlachta, PHD from NDVH, and Caroline LaPorte from NIWRC. */More Info >>
What is human trafficking and what does it look like in Indigenous, tribal communities? What can tribal communities do to address it? Call to action Learning Objectives: 1) participants will have an increased understanding of trafficking of Indigenous, tribal victims; 2) participants will have an increased understanding of what's currently available as resources to assist with development of local tribal responses; and 3) participants will contribute to growing network of organizations and individuals committed to ending trafficking of Indigenous, tribal peoples Moderated by Gwendolyn Packard, NIWRC Co-Presenters: Lisa Heth has worked in the field of domestic violence, sexual assault and...More Info >>
*/ Social Media can serve as the living voice of your organization and can convey your organization’s story, mission and drive to the general public and your intended audience. Each of your posts tells a piece of your organization’s story. Learn how to vet news stories, share resources, and the basics of what social media platforms are available. Find out how to take advanced approaches to social media such as positioning your page as a news source for your community, to reporting analytics and insights for funders, to seeing what works internally for your organizational needs. This webinar, provided by...More Info >>
*/ Understanding the mind body spirit connection, using its power and accessing its’ benefits is the basis of holistic healing. The concept of mind body spirit has been rooted in the culture and traditions of Indigenous peoples for thousands of years and is central to our belief and healing systems. Our healing systems and cultural practices took advantage of the power of belief or mind over body. Mind body spirit health and healing starts with you. When you make the choice for healing mind body and spirit, you reclaim your power and become an active participant in your healing process...More Info >>
Tribal Access Project: Information Sharing and Access to Federal Databases. Tribes can more effectively serve and protect victims of domestic and sexual violence by having full access to critical data across the Criminal Justice Information Services systems and other national criminal information systems. This webinar session will provide an update on the Tribal Access Project (TAP) that the U.S. Department of Justice launched to support tribal efforts to have orders of protection enforced outside their reservations, keep guns out of the wrong hands, register sex offenders, and allow tribes to have tribal arrests and tribal convictions be associated with their...More Info >>
INTRODUCTION This Special Collection is developed to highlight the issues, resources and other suggestions for addressing HIV and Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) within our communities. The collection organizes information and resources available on the internet such as tips and curricula drawn from the wealth of information gathered from partner organizations, experts from the field, and other allies. More specifically, this toolkit will house resources on cultural issues, national sources, statistics, topical issues and approaches, existing programs, and available material and resources to create awareness and promote important discussions about HIV/IPV. This collection will expand as resources and new information become...More Info >>
Does your program or tribe need some help creating materials promoting non-violence against Native women and children? Review our current 19 x13in Posters and 11 x 3.5in Bumper Stickers that your organization can customize to fit your needs. All materials listed here are provided under this Creative Commons 4.0 Public Licence . We would love to know how these materials are being used, so please send us a link to your final products . You will need: Adobe Illustrator CS6 + Locate your own printing company (suggestions provided below). Pay for your own printing of materials. Customize Capabilities: Download this...More Info >>
*This collection was developed and authored by the Indian Law Resource Center ( www.indianlaw.org ) February 10, 2016. International Advocacy to Help End Violence Against Native Women TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION I. United Nations (UN) A. Key Documents 1. World Conference on Indigenous Peoples Outcome Document (2014) 2. UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) 3. Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (1993) 4. Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) 5. UN Charter (1945) 6. List of resolutions and reports by the General Assembly and the Secretary General on violence against women II. UN General...More Info >>
Introduction This Special Collection is developed to highlight the issues, resources and other suggestions for engaging Native youth in our communities about healthy relationships and related tools. The Special Collection organizes information, resources, tips and curricula drawn from the wealth of information gathered from partner organizations, experts from the field, and other allies from the web. Specifically, in this Collection, will be resources on cultural issues, national sources, statistics, topical issues and approaches, existing programs, available material and resources to create awareness and promote important discussions about teen dating violence within our Native communities. The National Indigenous Women's Resource Center...More Info >>
In the beginning, the movement to end violence against women started as a grass-roots effort of women helping women. Soon shelters were started to create a safe, temporary space for women and their children who were fleeing the violence. With the advent of shelters came the institutional process of housing women in rule-driven environments. The subject of rules in shelter is a topic that comes up again and again. This timely and important webinar asks the question, “What would happen if there were no rules? Please join tribal domestic violence shelter directors and advocates as we explore the multitude of...More Info >>
In 2005, the national movement for the safety of Native women led the struggle to include in the Violence Against Women Act a separate title for Native women called Safety for Native Women. One of the findings that justified creation of the title was that during the period of 1979 through 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates...More Info >>

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