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VOCA

Victims of Crime Act

Indigenizing VAWA and VOCA Through Tribal Grassroots Organizing and Movement Building

This webinar will provide updates on recent VAWA reauthorization efforts and the importance of continued advocacy for a permanent VOCA fix for a dedicated tribal funding stream under the Crime Victims Fund (CVF). While a historic victory was achieved by the provision of tribal funding under the CVF in the FY 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill, the Department of Justice is pressed to award $133 million to Indian tribes before September 30, 2018. Discussion will also focus on concerns and challenges the timing of this award presents for tribes.

VOCA - Fact Sheet

The Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) was enacted in 1984 and established the Crime Victims Fund (CVF or Fund). The CVF is unique in that it is funded only through the collection of criminal fines, forfeited appearance bonds, penalties, and assessments. These dollars derive from offenders convicted of federal crimes and resulting fines and penalties; not taxpayers. While Congress does not appropriate funds for VOCA it does determine how much can be released or distributed each year from the CVF. The 2013 balance of the CVF was over $13 billion.

Addressing Tribal Victims of Crime, May 26, 2016 - TDVSAC webinar

The National Congress of American Indians Task Force on Violence Against Women will provide an update on efforts to remove barriers preventing American Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages from accessing the Crime Victim Fund. Unlike state and territorial governments, tribal governments do not receive an annual allocation from the Crime Victims Fund to help crime victims in their communities. American Indians and Alaska Natives experience the highest crime victimization rates in the country.

Addressing Tribal Victims of Crime

The National Congress of American Indians Task Force on Violence Against Women will provide an update on efforts to remove barriers preventing American Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages from accessing the Crime Victim Fund. Unlike state and territorial governments, tribal governments do not receive an annual allocation from the Crime Victims Fund to help crime victims in their communities.

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